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Bread Maker

 
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polaris



Joined: 07 May 2012
Posts: 252


Location: Scotland

PostPosted: Thu Sep 03, 2015 11:39 am    Post subject: Bread Maker  Reply with quote

I'm contemplating a bread maker. But have seen mixed reviews on the net about the bread they produce.
I've also considered getting one just to use the dough cycle and then put in the oven as normal.... Anybody got any advice on which method they prefer?
I've only ever done it the old fashioned way but it does take a lot of time and i dream of fresh bread timed to be ready first thing in the morning with no work involved!!
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Toddy



Joined: 08 Sep 2007
Posts: 820


Location: Lanarkshire

PostPosted: Thu Sep 03, 2015 1:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

We've got one, and it gets used too. If you don't mind the occasional wonky looking loaf, eat a fair bit of bread, and are happy to try different recipes, then I'd say go for it
It makes really easy variety of bread, just add seasoning, nuts, seeds, fruits, as you choose. It also makes savory ones like pizza flavoured ones that can be thick sliced to make the base for bread 'pizzas'. It'll just do the dough for that too though if you want.
I like making bread by hand, but the breadmaker makes it easy. Just put everything into the bowl and let it get on with it
House smells great, you know it's done when it beeps, and the bread doesn't hang around long, but gets eaten in a very timely fashion. Win/win I reckon.
You don't need to buy an all singing, whistles and bells one either. Basic as they come will still make bread.

M
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polaris



Joined: 07 May 2012
Posts: 252


Location: Scotland

PostPosted: Thu Sep 03, 2015 3:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Toddy wrote:
We've got one, and it gets used too. If you don't mind the occasional wonky looking loaf, eat a fair bit of bread, and are happy to try different recipes, then I'd say go for it
It makes really easy variety of bread, just add seasoning, nuts, seeds, fruits, as you choose. It also makes savory ones like pizza flavoured ones that can be thick sliced to make the base for bread 'pizzas'. It'll just do the dough for that too though if you want.
I like making bread by hand, but the breadmaker makes it easy. Just put everything into the bowl and let it get on with it
House smells great, you know it's done when it beeps, and the bread doesn't hang around long, but gets eaten in a very timely fashion. Win/win I reckon.
You don't need to buy an all singing, whistles and bells one either. Basic as they come will still make bread.

M


I was going to buy the £40 Argos one, the reviews are all great, the only thing I'm concerned about is apparently the paddle stays in while cooking? I was thinking I could take the dough out, remove the paddle, put the dough back in again, and bake? To avoid having to pull the paddle out of the finished loaf. Or would this leave a hole in the bottom of the pan? I'm not sure how the paddle works!

Otherwise, I was thinking I can use it to do all the hard work and then bake the dough as you normally would in the oven.

I hate shop bread, but I grudge the time making fresh as I have a very busy day.... This seems like a good compromise...
I'm happy to hear a good review. All bread wonky or not would get eaten as we have a love of things that need breadcrumbs in this house too! And the chickens and local birds wouldn't starve either.
Have you had any major issues? Or tips you could give? A lot of reviews say that you have to be incredibly careful with your measuring, and get it perfect
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I plan to be as self-sufficient as is possible in this day and age by the time I'm 25, all advice on moving towards that goal is welcome.
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Toddy



Joined: 08 Sep 2007
Posts: 820


Location: Lanarkshire

PostPosted: Thu Sep 03, 2015 4:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gavin makes most of the bread here (I have to live mostly gluten free these days), and he waits until the first set of beeps is finished, that's when you are supposed to add any extras like seeds or fruits, gives it a little while (about ten minutes or so) to mix everything in and then removes the paddle.
He says that some of the modern breadmakers have paddles that fold up so they don't have the 'hole in the bottom of the loaf' thing as an issue. I just let the bread sit with the paddle in it for a while as it cools and the bottom crust softens a little, and then figure out the angle it's sitting at and cut in along that with a butter knife, and then pull the central bit and the whole paddle slides out easily. It's not a big thing, and certainly not worth getting out of a warm bed too early in the morning to remove it
The paddle is just a wee thing that sits on a spigot that is turned by the motor. No hole in the bottom of the pan to leak. Taking it out just leaves the spigot thing uncovered. It's as clean as you leave it from the previous use. I just fill the the pan up (it comes out of the machine) with hot water and put the paddle in to clean up too. Give it a wash out like the dishes, let it dry, put it back in the machine and it's done. Simple.

To be honest, you get used to what you have. Ours works fine, makes good (if sometimes wonky looking) great tasting, good textured, bread.

I've just asked him about it and he says that he reckons that three quarters of an hour after the machine starts is when he takes out the paddle.

I think on it like fruit and veg you've grown rather than bought in a supermarket….idiosyncrasy's not a bad thing. It's unique !

No real tips, but the recipe on the bags of flour are worth trying to start with.
We've never had a loaf we couldn't eat, put it that way, some were a bit 'going hard awfully quick' though, so we just ate them up in a hurry
I bought  books full of recipes, but the ones that work easiest actually came with the breadmaker. It doesn't even matter what bread flour you use;  Allinson's, Hovis (though we do like that one) Sainsbury's, Morrison's, Tesco's or Lidl's, they've all worked well for us. Check the dates on the packs of yeast though, I buy those with as long a date as I can find. Again, the Lidl's stuff is as good as the Allinsons.

M

p.s. he says to mind and grease the paddle before you start; it makes a difference.
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Last edited by Toddy on Fri Sep 04, 2015 3:55 pm; edited 1 time in total
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polaris



Joined: 07 May 2012
Posts: 252


Location: Scotland

PostPosted: Thu Sep 03, 2015 7:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Toddy wrote:
Gavin makes most of the bread here (I have to live mostly gluten free these days), and he waits until the first set of beeps is finished, that's when you are supposed to add any extras like seeds or fruits, gives it a little while (about ten minutes or so) to mix everything in and then removes the paddle.
He says that some of the modern breadmakers have paddles that fold up so they don't have the 'hole in the bottom of the loaf' thing as an issue. I just let the bread sit with the paddle in it for a while as it cools and the bottom crust softens a little, and then figure out the angle it's sitting at and cut in along that with a butter knife, and then pull the central bit and the whole paddle slides out easily. It's not a big thing, and certainly not worth getting out of a warm bed too early in the morning to remove it
The paddle is just a wee thing that sits on a spigot that is turned by the motor. No hole in the bottom of the pan to leak. Taking it out just leaves the spigot thing uncovered. It's as clean as you leave it from the previous use. I just fill the the pan up (it comes out of the machine) with hot water and put the paddle in to clean up too. Give it a wash out like the dishes, let it dry, put it back in the machine and it's done. Simple.

To be honest, you get used to what you have. Ours works fine, makes good (if sometimes wonky looking) great tasting, good textured, bread.

I've just asked him about it and he says that he reckons that three quarters of an hour after the machine starts is when he takes out the paddle.

I think on it like fruit and veg you've grown rather than bought in a supermarket….idiosyncrasy's not a bad thing. It's unique !

No real tips, but the recipe on the bags of flour are worth trying to start with.
We've never had a loaf we couldn't eat, put it that way, some were a bit 'going hard awfully quick' though, so we just ate them up in a hurry
I bought  books full of recipes, but the ones that work easiest actually came with the breadmaker. It doesn't even matter what bread flour you use;  Allinson's, Hovis (though we do like that one) Sainsbury's, Morrison's, Tesco's or Lidl's, they've all worked well for us. Check the dates on the packs of yeast though, I buy those with as long a date as I can fine. Again, the Lidl's stuff is as good as the Alllinsons.

M

p.s. he says to mind and grease the paddle before you start; it makes a difference.


What incredible advice! All that has put me a lot more at ease about the idea, I'll eat anything, any shape or size, but we'd like to master the loaf for sandwiches as I don't think I could live without sandwiches!  
I'm going to take the plunge and get one then. Worst case scenario I'll have an unholy amount of fun and even if I can't master baking in it, it will certainly make the dough stage so much easier for the future! After my riding accident I'm not so much up for kneading for ages anymore!
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I plan to be as self-sufficient as is possible in this day and age by the time I'm 25, all advice on moving towards that goal is welcome.
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perlogalism



Joined: 02 Feb 2015
Posts: 97


Location: Welshpool way

PostPosted: Fri Sep 04, 2015 11:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My advice would be to get a cheap one: We had two and they were used until they both died. After that we got a "good" one with all the bells and whistles and it doesn't make either bread or dough very well. As a result, it sits in the cupboard most of the time  

The most success we had was with dough and then finished in the oven. Bread made in the machine is OK but isn't "quite" right.

Quantities are very important and (apparently) different machines require slight variations. You'll probably have a few failures at first but persevere.

Good luck and enjoy  
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Seabird



Joined: 06 Oct 2007
Posts: 4532


Location: North Wales

PostPosted: Fri Sep 04, 2015 2:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I always take the paddle out at the end of the kneading stage. You can then reshape the loaf nicely before it starts cooking.
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polaris



Joined: 07 May 2012
Posts: 252


Location: Scotland

PostPosted: Fri Sep 04, 2015 4:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Taking the plunge and buying one tonight.

Cooker works XBM1128

Fingers crossed, and there will be a photographic post following my adventures and misadventures as they happen and as I learn. wish me luck!

Any other advice pleas keep it flooding in as I am more than happy to hear everything!


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All the things the world has forgotten... Doesn't it make you sad...?
~~~
I plan to be as self-sufficient as is possible in this day and age by the time I'm 25, all advice on moving towards that goal is welcome.
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