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Mo

Yarnbombing

I'm quietly excited to be involved in a yarnbomb planned for February.

Eden Mancap, who Steve works for, have teamed up with the Rotary Club to #turnpenrithpurple in a bid to raise awareness about Polio and the need for continued vaccination.

I am knitting all things purple at the moment

I wondered if anyone here has been involved in a yarnbomb?

I was at school with one boy who had Polio - he wore calipers.
I was involved, on the periphery, in vaccinations in West Africa many years ago but had not realised that  "Purple for Polio" was representative of the dye used to show which children had been vaccinated.
Gareth

We are not involved in yarning bombing, but have seen it almost everywhere we've been last year: Amsterdam, Nijmegen, Breda, Eindhoven, Zundert, Utrecht, Antwerp, Delft, Rotterdam, Cork, Blarney, Cohb, Limerick, Ely, Norwich, London, Lincoln, and even in smaller villages here in Norfolk.
Toddy

I have never heard of it   but anything that encourages folks to be vaccinated agin polio is a very good thing.
I too mind children in callipers, and one of my husband's cousins has worn them since he was at primary school. He was very ill indeed and wasn't expected to survive. He's over seventy now, and has spent his life with the pain and discomfort and disability of it.
One of the girls in the street we used to live in was in an iron lung for weeks on end too.

It ought to be as wiped out as smallpox, and the sooner the better.

M
Gareth

A yarn bombed tree at the Octagon Unitary Chapel in Norwich:



And a yarn bombed grill at Blarney Castle.

Seabird

What a fun thing to do!

I. too remember the effects of polio. When I was a child, the girl across the road always walked with a limp - It wasn't until she was a teenager that the medics announced that she had suffered a bout of polio as a young child. She got away lightly though - do any of our older members remember a Coventry City footballer called Jeff Hall who died of polio while it was raging through the Midlands? That would be I reckon in the late 1950s.

Do kids routinely get vaccinated now?
Juli

I cannot remember which type of polio vaccine was being used but as twin and I were 15 we were over the age for vaccination.

I had  a later polio attack which was triggered by a fall, and until recently I was wearing heavy leg calipers.  I stopped wearing them a year or so back because they hurt too much, did not help and, and I am a lot happier and more comfortable in a specialist electric wheelchair.  I still needed elbow crutches when wearing my calipers so what was the point in wearing them any longer?

But we were only months over the age for vaccination.  I wonder how things might have turned out had we been just those few months younger.
Mo

Three countries still have the Polio virus - Afghanistan, Nigeria and Pakistan - although I believe that Nigeria hasn't had any new reported cases for a while.

The vaccine in the UK is an option these days.

Until it is eradicated, transmission of the virus remains a risk to all children.

I was surprised (although I guess I shouldn't have been) that many of the younger generation I encounter have no real idea about Polio.

Famously, I know Ian Dury and Mary Berry were victims of the virus.

Thank you to those of you who have commented x
Mo

Toddy wrote:
<snip>
One of the girls in the street we used to live in was in an iron lung for weeks on end too.

It ought to be as wiped out as smallpox, and the sooner the better.

M


With reference to the Iron Lung, the Rotary Club has an exhibition one which will be in Penrith in May, I think.

http://www.upperedenrotary.org.uk/enterprises/ironlung.htm
Mo

On a lighter note, I have been tasked with making a hat for the Penrith clock tower  

Does the vast experience present in the group have any experience of this?  
Mo

Seabird wrote:
<snip>
do any of our older members remember a Coventry City footballer called Jeff Hall who died of polio while it was raging through the Midlands? That would be I reckon in the late 1950s.



Thanks for that Seabird - Jeff Hall was crucial - from Wikipedia:

"It was the death of Hall – a young, fit, international footballer – from polio which helped to kick-start widespread public acceptance in Britain of the need for vaccination. Though the disease was generally feared and the Salk vaccine was available, takeup had been slow. In the weeks following Hall's death, and after his widow, Dawn, spoke on television about her loss, demand for immunisation rocketed. Emergency vaccination clinics had to be set up and supplies of the vaccine flown in from the United States to cope with the demand"
Mo

Thanks for the photo's Gareth
Mo

Would anyone mind me quoting your experiences anonymously?

We have a number of experiences building up as we talk to people and would like to use these to show how the virus had, and still has, an impact on people's lives.
Juli

Having just checked the dates, the first polio vaccine was the inactivated polio vaccine, given by injection.  It was developed by Jonas Salk and came into use in 1955 and only given to children under the age of 15.  Which is why my twin and I missed out, having been born in March 1942.

The oral polio vaccine was developed by Albert Sabin and came into commercial use in 1961.  This is the one on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most important medication needed in a basic health system.

We did eventually get the injectable Salk vaccine because the oral Sabin was still for only children, as by then the Salk vaccine was considered as  "better than nothing".  

I remember having a very sore arm and feeling unwell for a while - my twin did not.  And being told that it was just a reaction to the injection, although my legs went through a phase of severe weakness some years later.  I had already been using crutches and leg irons before the fall due to major leg weakness, which did not help the fall .   The fall caused the fractures in my neck and spine, but after a heck of a lot of tests, it was thought that I had had what they called secondary polio, probably triggered from the first vaccination.  The leg weakness was the initial result, and the fall triggered off the major problems.  

Such a long time ago though.  Everyone thought the new vaccine would be the end of polio - and that older children did not need it.  And yet the local swimming pool was closed for over a year.
kaz

Good luck with the yarnbombing - it will certainly be noticed and get people talking.......it's going to be a big hat to fit a clock tower!!  
Gareth

Nah,

Penrith clock tower is only a piddly little provincial one.  



Mo



Remind me of that when I'm atop a cherry picker trying to put a hat on it!
Gareth

Mo,

Now this is a clock tower: Norwich City Hall




I am I the only one, but is anyone else reminded of Bender?
Mo

Yep! Looks just like Bender  

Nice tower but it would look ridiculous in Penrith - even if it didn't look like Bender.
Seabird

I remember an air of panic in the Midlands after Jeff Hall's death, and queueing at the school clinic for the vaccination. I guess that was when Gaynor, the girl across the road contracted the disease - I wonder why it wasn't diagnosed then. She had to wait till she was a teenager to find the cause of her limp.

Before travelling to Hong Kong in the 1980s  my OH and I were given polio vaccine (on a sugar lump this time) along with jabs for other nasties.
Mo

Apparently, one of the reasons parents opt out of letting their children have the vaccine here in the UK is because they dropped the use of the sugar lump (bad for you) and the vaccine tastes bloomin' awful on it's own.

sugar lump vs polio ?
Mo

Mo wrote:
Would anyone mind me quoting your experiences anonymously?

We have a number of experiences building up as we talk to people and would like to use these to show how the virus had, and still has, an impact on people's lives.


Sorry to ask again, but I can I share what's been mentioned in here please?
I would keep names out of it.
Seabird

I've no problem, though of course I wasn't directly affected.

Perhaps we should go back to injection then.  Today's needles and syringes are far better than in the 50s.  Big glass syringes and a needle the size of a knitting needle!  Ouch!!
sod

Seabird wrote:
I've no problem, though of course I wasn't directly affected.

Perhaps we should go back to injection then.  Today's needles and syringes are far better than in the 50s.  Big glass syringes and a needle the size of a knitting needle!  Ouch!!


Have to agree as I have blood tests several times a year and shots none of which hurt   the gear is so small and people doing them seem so good at it.

Bad taste or polio  
Juli

Mo wrote:
Mo wrote:
Would anyone mind me quoting your experiences anonymously?

We have a number of experiences building up as we talk to people and would like to use these to show how the virus had, and still has, an impact on people's lives.


Sorry to ask again, but I can I share what's been mentioned in here please?
I would keep names out of it.


If anything I have posted can be of any help, of course you can use it.  There is possibly a lot more that I can help you with, not only from the time but later results.

I will be pleased to answer any questions you might have - just PM me if I can be of any help.
Mo

Thank you so much, Juli & Seabird.

It's all about awareness - the younger generations know so little about it even though it is still a threat.

It is an indication of how widespread the virus was that many of the older generations were either affected personally, or knew someone who was.

We have collected many little memories, and some large ones, which we would like to display as an awareness tool.
Seabird

And, of course, Lord Snowdon. I'd forgotten he's been a polio sufferer.
Mo

Today's the day

The weather is being typically Cumbrian - ideal for working outdoors with wool!

Sadly, the cherry picker we have lined up is poorly so the hat won't go up until during the week but we have plenty more woolly stuff to play with.
Mo

Does my bum look big in this?



This is outside the Eden Mencap offices.

There are more pictures of the bombing here:
*WARNING* This is a Facebook link.
https://www.facebook.com/emspenrith/posts/1110244062418373

I'm still waiting for my hat to go onto the clock.

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