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Cabbagepatch

Worm farm

Does anyone use a worm farm as a means of recycling household waste? Would be interested to learn more about it. Also Bokashi
Gary

My daughter has an Ant farm and they are all called Alan! :-)
Lloyd

Bokashi???....wossatten?
Cabbagepatch

A way of using kitchen waste including meats to turn it into compost for the plot. Try to keep up Lloydy! :q28:

Here's a link:
http://www.smartsoil.co.uk/?gclid=CKP-q-WtuY8CFQ1CMAodvAcGYQ


I think Wiggly Wormers is a good one too. Just interested if anyone has first hand experience of them.
jayay

I have a wormery, its on old dustbin, with holes punched in the bottom 4 inches, it then has a 4 inch layer of gravel to keep it drained, then a piece of fine mesh, mine is an old net curtain. (it has to be replaced from time to time) then a layer of leaf mould or when you've had your wormery for a while you put back the not fully eaten stuff. For the worms you either get the posh ones from wiggerly worms or get Bodger or anyone who has a muck heap to give you some from the bottom of the heap. Keep the lid on or they will escape and don't fill the bin to the top because they need an air gap and as long as you take the lid off everyday or so they wont suffocate.


(The wiggerly worms are very fussy eaters and their instructions say you should shred up the waste before you give it to them. my mum has hers from them and the whole kit is a bit fiddly) Mine just get the peelings thrown in any old how. You can put in some paper as long as it is damp, cardboard egg boxes etc, I put tea bags in but you are left with the cases which the worms don't eat and must be made of a plastic material. I don't put meat in mine because I don't want it smelly and attracting vermin.

The professional ones you buy have a tap for the worm pee, which you draw off and use as fertiliser on your garden, I dont bother as my wormery is next to my veg patch and I move it everytime I empty it. Now this is the good bit, when you empy it out you have to take off the top layer which isnt very well eaten and then the lovely layer of compost, the hardest part is getting the worms out of the compost to put back in the wormery. The only way is by hand so not for those who dont like worms.

Another tip is they dont like to get too hot, keep them in the shade otherwise you end up with a bin of what looks like cooked spaghetti but is infact cooked worms.

I think they only bred in the spring/summer when you have tiny worms that look like thread in the bin as well, so best time to empty it is now or in the spring.

Hope that helps
Cabbagepatch

Thanks for that jayjay, really helpful and i like the idea of making one rather than buying something unnecessarily expensive. We have an spare water butt, do you think I could utilise that?

Isn't it better to have a tap as well though? I thought the liquid was a really good fertiliser

[quote="jayay" For the worms you either get the posh ones from wiggerly worms or get Bodger or anyone who has a muck heap to give you some from the bottom of the heap. [/color]So, I just need to ask Bodger to bring a bucket of worms along with everything else to the Cider Tour then......... :smt103 :smt103 :smt103

No, perhaps not :q20:
jayay

An old waterbutt would be good, make sure the gravel in the bottom goes 2" above the tap otherwise they might drown.

Bodger says he is short of worms :: something to do with shavings in the stables and having to dig a long way down to the bottom of the heap.

Dont think he will have time before tomorrow. :-) Maybe they keep animals on the cider farm and you could dig for your own

have fun
Cabbagepatch

jayay wrote:


Bodger says he is short of worms :: something to do with shavings in the stables and having to dig a long way down to the bottom of the heap.

Dont think he will have time before tomorrow. :-) I'm sure I can live without them a bit longer!! :q28: Maybe they keep animals on the cider farm and you could dig for your own

have fun


Trust me jayjay, I have absolutely no intention whatsoever of digging for worms this weekend [smilie=pdt_aliboronz_24.gif] [smilie=pdt_aliboronz_24.gif] [smilie=pdt_aliboronz_24.gif]
Christine

Sure and I use a wormery - I inherited a cold compost heap (none of your fancy bins, boxes, fussy eaters and wotsits) on the allotment and it's full of them. I keep feeding it and using it and feeding it and using it and the worms keep doing their own thing - breeding by the looks of the numbers.

I've used two big lots of compost from it since 28th February last year and there's another lot brewing nicely. Another 6 weeks I would say.
Bex

My compost heap has always been full of worms which seem to survive and multiply very well without the effort of making sure that they are wet enough/dry enough/ warm enough/ cold enough :q28:
BorderReiver

They don't like onions or citrus apparently.

When using the worm juice as fertiliser,dilute one part juice to nine parts of water,it's strong stuff. :-)
freckle

We use Bokashi and are impressed with the system.  It is amazing how after 2 or more weeks and sealed container of non compostable kitchen waste doesn't smell!!  Definately need two containers though as it has to be left for a fortnight before you empty it.  Haven't been brave enough to mix it with the compost yet-just prefer to dig it into a trench.  But it has reduced our bin smells to zero-no food waste goes into the bin, it either goes to guinea pigs, dogs, compost or Bokashi.  
We also have a Green Cone-won it from our local council-but haven't set it up yet.
mrutty

Got Can-o-worms here, very good system, but pricey
Ratman

Have a word with Countrysider, he's got worms  ::  ::

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