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Kirribindi Farm

Welsh Cakes

I'm seeking a recipe for Welsh cakes for my (Welsh) Dad.
He's 91 and legally blind but wants to make them.
So a basic recipe would be perfect.

We had them in Abergavenny.
Kind of like a flat scone full of sultanas.

Jacquie
pjb

http://www.visitwales.co.uk/about...ecipes/welsh-recipes/welsh-cakes/


That should be a good starting point, they're best made on a flat griddle/bake stone.
Wilder

I haven't checked out the link that pjb gave, so this may well be the same, but it is my Mother's tried and tested (ad well-loved) recipe:

8 oz flour & a pinch of salt
2 oz butter or firm margerine
2 oz lard
3 oz caster sugar
2-3 oz currants or raisins
1 teasp ground nutmeg
1 egg, beaten
1 tabsp milk

Sift flour and salt together.  
Cut up butter and lard and rub into flour until it resembles breadcrumbs.
Stir in all other dry ingredients then mix with egg and milk to a firm dough.
Roll out to 1/4 inch thick, cut into circles and cook on a hot griddle (a frying pan will also work) for 3 minutes each side.

Makes approx. 24.

Lovely spread with butter!

PS.  Apologies if any 'n's are missing, but my computer has developed a sticky keyboard!
sapphire

I do welsh cakes with jam rather than currants (horrid things   ) I just make them plain then slice in half put plum jam on then stick back together.
Wilder

Ah, now I agree with you there, sapphire.  I absolutely HATE currants! Nasty, bitty things that stick between your teeth.   However, I DO like raisins and sultanas, so I substitute them whenever a recipe calls for currants.  

However, in the interests of transparency (one of today's buzz-words, I understand) I thought I ought to type the recipe as my mother gave it to me.  Mind you, she wasn't particularly fond of currants either!  
Kirribindi Farm

Many thanks.
I knew you lovely people would have good recipes at your fingertips.

I'll copy/paste them into an email to send to Dad.
91 but he still uses a computer with the aid of magnifying software.

Jacquie
bodger

Sign him up for OTG Jacquie
Kirribindi Farm

I was going to, grumpy ole bugger that he is.

Ok his response and you'll see why I refer to him as a grumpy ole bugger:

Dad said:
"The Welsh cakes I am referring to are called BAKESTONES and contain
currants, sultanas and bits of candied peel.
A Bakestone is a very thick round iron plate which is heated on a gas ring
or even on a coal fire ,It retains its heat for a long time, enough to do a
batch of 'bakestones' as they are commonly called in South Wales.
You make up as many as you can because they go fast
The recipe you quoted are for a kind of scone, not a patch on bakestones
which are really yummy without having to put butter or jam on them because they contain all that dried fruit in them.
My Mum used to make a big sheet of pastry about 3/16  inch thick and use a pastry cutter which cut out round pieces about 3 - 4 inches in diameter. The pastry was quite moist and sticky and that was the reason you have to roll it out onto sa well sprinkled large board or tiled surface the rolling pin was also well covered in flour too so that it did not stick to the pastry.
When all these rounds were ready, maybe a hundred of then Mum would start laing them on her 'Bakestone', heated on the coal fire and after both sides were light brown she 'aired' them on a wire grid and later on put them into a large bread tin (in those days biscuits used to come in large metal tins)
Us kids were bribed with 'bakedstones instead of lollies as they were really
nice after they had been kept for a few days in the closed bin.
Please talk to your Welsh friendsas they would know and immediately know what other kind of Welsh Cakes you wanted a recipe for."

No "Thankyou Jacqueline for asking" just a "You asked for the wrong recipe." So I'll try again. Anyone know a recipe for the type my Dad refers to?

Thanks.
Jacquie
bodger

The name 'Grumpy Ole Bugger' hasn't been taken and is available.
Kirribindi Farm

Hahaha. Tempting. So apt. Why do people get grumpier as they get older?
Is it coz they just don't don't give a rats if they offend people anymore?

His response to signing him up is that he doesn't have enough time in his day to read a forum.

Goodness. I better get lots of rest now coz I expect to be sooooooooo busy when I'm 91.

Jacquie
12Bore

bodger wrote:
The name 'Grumpy Ole Bugger' hasn't been taken and is available.

  maybe I should apply for a transfer...
kat_lewis

Hi I googlesd this and hope it helps:
 
Title: Welsh Cakes (bakestone Recipes)
Categories: Breads
 Servings:  4



     8 oz Plain flour
     1 t  Baking powder
   1/4 t  Mixed spice
     2 oz Butter or margarine
     2 oz Lard
     3 oz Granulated sugar
     2 oz Raisins (or currants)
     1    Egg, beaten
     3 T  Milk


 Sift the flour, baking powder and spice into a mizing bowl.  Cut the fat
 into the flour, and rub it to a breadcrumb-like consistency;  then mix in
 the sugar and raisins.  Mix in the egg, and sufficient milk to make a
 stiff dough.  Roll out on a floured board to 1/4 inch thick.  Cut into 3
 inch rounds.  Bake on a hot greased bakestone until golden brown, about 4
 minutes on each side.
 *
 Variation:  "Teisen Dinca" -- Make up the Welsh Cake dough adding 6 oz
 peeled and grated cooking apples before adding the egg.  Mix to a stiff
 dough, adding milk if necessary.  Roll out, cut into rounds and cook on
 the bakestone as for Welsh Cakes.  Serve hot with butter, golden syrup, or
 honey.
Kirribindi Farm

Thanks for that.
I'll pass it on to my Dad.
See what he says.....

Jacquie
milkermel

8oz sr flour
4oz butter (at his age dont bother with marg butter tastes so much better)
mix together until breadcrumb texture
Add
3oz caster sugar
4oz sultanas

mix through lightly and then add
1 beaten egg and a little milk if needed

roll out about cm thick and cut into rings

toss in sugar as soon as they come off the hot plate - I have cooked these sucessfully on a flat griddle pan over a gas hob, but better on the cool side of Aga (lightly oiled) or on top of my rayburn hot plate.

This was a recipe i used to make them for my father in law in wales him and all his welsh friends thought they hit the mark.
Reason for using sultanas is that it makes cakes last a few minutes longer as sultanas are too hot to eat straight of the hot plate

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