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bodger

Traditional Polish sausage and the Hairy Bikers.

I watched a new episode of the Hairy Bikers earlier this week, they were in Poland. It looks as though they're going to be doing a tour of some of the old eastern block countries, they're in Estonia next week.
I like the HB's and really liked the  look of Poland, if you didn't see the programme, then it would be well worth you having a look on catch up.

They visited large family living in the middle of nowhere who are famed for making their own artisan sausages. They used small scale very old fashioned equipment to make some wonderful looking bangers and how they did it looked very simple and straight forward. There may have been one or two family secrets that they didn't reveal but I'm definitely going to have a go at making some traditional Polish sausages.

They used some fatty looking pork and minced it very coarsely. As far as spices went, it was very dimple. They used masses of garlic cloves and added black pepper and salt.
The sausage mix was mixed very thoroughly by hand, before being used to fill some fairly hefty sausage skins.
The sausages were then cold smoked using oak chippings for three hours.
now this is where they threw this novice sausage maker a little bit.
They hadn't finished with the sausages yet and instead of frying them in a pan or grilling them, they proceeded to chuck em into a big pan of boiling water and boil them up for a few hours.
The sausages were served up cold and they sliced fantastically. After seeing them made, I could almost taste em.
Those Polish sausages have definitely gone on my to make list.
Toddy

Those sound like old fashioned 'puddings'.
In the past the stomach bag and the intestines were washed out (salt water) and used to stuff full with of all of the bits of the beast that weren't to be served as 'meat' or preserved as 'ham', minced up with the extra fatty bits (not the suet from around the kidneys, that kept well and as a hard 'dry' fat was used for other things) often with sprices and cereals added, tied tight and boiled until cooked. Haggis is a classic example, so is black pudding, but we have white pudding here too, sometimes known as mealy pudding.

If you get it right, and the skins are sound once boiled up, a thin layer of fat really seals the sausage and it'll keep for yonks. I know some folks brine wash them afterwards as an extra preservative, but in our climate, which is always damp, that's not always such a good idea. We don't get dry cold here, we get damp and chilly here, not frozen solid, and you don't want anything that will attract moisture and allow mould to grow.

I have made real haggis, and mealy puddings too. We didn't have fresh blood so we didn't make black puddings. Grandpa liked his white puddings well spiced though.
I don't remember much garlic ever being used in my childhood, but black pepper, mustard and allspice was used by the pound !

Interested to hear how you get on with making your own.
What does the slaughterhouse do with the blood from your pigs ? If it's bucketed then it'll make good puddings too.

M
midlandsman

For Polish sausages this book is the 'go to' resource:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Polish-Sa...ecipes-Instructions/dp/0982426720

I make a hot-smoked one, but cold-smoking followed by poaching is common. Don't boil them though or chances are they'll split. Keep the water around 80C.

HTH
Toddy

Midlandman's quite right, they're poached, not boiled. Ours were cooked long and slow, just on the simmer and no more.
Don't know about the Polish ones though; the book sounds a good recommendation

M
rhino

You can't carry fresh blood without a hazardous waste licence. Most black pudding is either made on site or from dried blood.  
bodger

I've managed to find the book here.

http://www.abebooks.co.uk/servlet...2C++Miroslaw+Gebarowski&sts=t
midlandsman

This link shows some at cheaper prices:

http://www.abebooks.co.uk/servlet...lts?kn=polish+marianski&sts=t

MM
bodger


Including this one, there are three books available by this trio on kindle.
midlandsman

I consider this one to be the 'bible' of curing and sausage:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Home-Prod...lity-Meats-Sausages/dp/0982426739

MM
perlogalism

.. and this is my bible: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Manual-Tr...s&dpST=_AC_UL320_SR260%2C320_

I met Maynard at a village show a few years ago and it turns out he lives just up the road from me. Fascinating man and a brilliant book!
bodger

I've lost a couple of stone since this photo.

http://overthegate.myfreeforum.or...t16060.html&highlight=maynard
midlandsman

All his books make great reads.

MM

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