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Pilsbury

tips to survive the cold

i thought I would start this thread after having real problems starting my old diesel car.
can we have some real sensible tips people have for making life easier in this weather, there must be the knowldge out there so how about sharing it.

my first tip is this,
My old diesel really really hates this cold, the fuel drains away from the engine and it drains the battery whenI try and start it from cold, so tonight after I cycled home from work i got my hot water bottle and filled it, placed a layer of foil on the top only to reflect the heat down and wrapped it in a towle, then put it on my engine block, an hour later I refreshed it and the block was feeling warmer, 30 mins later I put on a fully charged battery and it started second time even though it was -4,
i am dropping my SIL home and then I will put a layer of foil o n the engine then a towle then some foil to keep the heat in until morning.
MrsWW

Sorry mate, not meaning to be flippant but I was going to suggest cuddling up to my OH to survive the cold  

I know you've had problems with your car - mine hates the cold starts too as it doesn't do too many miles meaning I tend to easily drain the battery in a week of early cold starts.
Pilsbury

cuddleing OH is a perfect way to keep warm, we also have 2 duvets on the bed at the moment
MrsWW

Pilsbury wrote:
we also have 2 duvets on the bed at the oment


One duvet (larger than bed) and one Collie dog (to seal up gaps as needed)  
dan

2 duvets and leki blanket on high  

then in the morning early before the heating comes on.................oil heater switched to high and sit on it  while having first cuppa and starting laptop up    
varminty

OH works night so good duvet and 3 furry hot water bottles of the four legged kind.
MrsWW

Serious tip now - if you don't cover your windscreen before you go to bed - DO IT!  

Last few mornings I've been using a windscreen cover that I got for Chrimbo - you spend no time using blowers/wipers etc to clear the screen so therefore save battery power.
kaz

A good thread Pilsbury

Dress with many thin layers of clothes rather than one thick layer. The layers act as insulation.
mogs

not very trendy i'm afraid,      but i always wear a thermal, long sleeved vest in the winter with a t shirt over the top. i also wear a fleecy lined quilted lumberjack shirt.

either jeans or jodphurs, and thermal socks.

oh i always wear a hat too......soo much body heat is lost thru the top of your head.

this, ofcourse, is if i am working out in the fields or around this place......if i go out '' dressed up '', it is a different matter......  
Morlan75

Only way Im going to survive today is..... stay in bed!  
green man

http://www.dunelm-mill.com/range/Crimson%20Blanket//1

I snuggle into a pair of these placed in between the sheets fantastic, no leccy blanket needed no CH and just one duvet. Light weight snuggly soft warmth.
dtalbot

MrsWW wrote:
Serious tip now - if you don't cover your windscreen before you go to bed - DO IT!  

Last few mornings I've been using a windscreen cover that I got for Chrimbo - you spend no time using blowers/wipers etc to clear the screen so therefore save battery power.

Don't even need a fancy cover, stop the wipers at 45 degrees and put a few sheets of newspaper under them to cover the screen (dead easy for me as I park next to the recycling point so just borrow a paper or two over night!)
bodger

Cuddle the OH?  oh.gif  oh.gif  oh.gif  Just how bdooly cold is it where you live ?
morlan578

Quite suprised no ones mentioned move to the med    
Happymama

I don't have central heating or a fire, just a gas bottle heater that usually is on either 1kw or 2kW's if it's very cold.

It's February. Wear a jumper!

If it's cold, wear two!

Sleep in socks.

I have 640 thread count bed linen in the winter and I can't begin to tell you how much difference it makes to how warm the bed is.

My gas heater is in a large room, 10 ft ceiling, with an open staircase. I leave the kids bedroom doors open during the day so they come home to warm bedrooms, then when they've gone to bed I open my bedroom door and it warms mine before I go to bed. No waste!

My kitchen and bathroom are completely uninsulated (to be sorted soon) and unheated. We're still alive.

Close the curtains at dusk rather than waiting for proper dark.

My living room is usually about 14 Deg C, and the kids run around in t-shirts, You can get very easily used to it being cold, I just wear one very large loose jumper usually.

Moving to the med is what's going to happen when the kids leave home. 15 yrs and counting ... I'll be a mad catwoman and grow lemons on some Spanish hillside.
Eschra

Having lived in Scotland most of my young life I learnt to deal with the cold but there are some really good tips for the winter (sorry some have been given).

1. Purchase some thermals (our local ex-chain store shop does mens thermal sleeved t -shirts and leggings for 2.99) they make great pyjamas too when really cold.

2. Invest in thermal socks too - under or over a second pair of socks in REALLY cold weather makes all the difference (I have a disability which gives me bad circulation in my feet/hands in winter).

3. Fleece blankets - When we are cold downstairs instead of boosting the heat we throw a fleece blanket over our knees for the couple of hours when we actually have time to sit down and relax.

4. Wear layers - in addition to the thermals, we layer up with t-shirts, shirts/rugby shirts, jumpers and gilets or fleece tops. You can take layers off and cool down quicker than you can warm up.

5. Always wear hats outside. They maintain body heat - It doesn't have to be a wooly hat. I wear a Barmah folding brimmed hat in waxed leather everywhere all year round. The hat keeps off the sun in summer, the rain, wind and snow in winter and fitted right stays on in all but the strongest winds.

6. LOL! Always snuggle up to something warm in bed, be it the dog, OH or a hot water bottle -or if you're lucky all 3!    

7. If your house doesn't have great heating, make a flask of tea or coffee, or even hot dilute orange. Getting up to a cold house is easier with a warm drink inside and with a decent flask should still be pleasantly warm even after a sleep in on a weekend should you be lucky enough to be able to have one.

8. Line your curtains with thermal linings and tuck them behind the top of the radiator if you are unlucky enough to have radiator by the windows like us. Always close the curtains when night starts to draw in, as you'll loose less heat through the window even with double glazing (They also reduce the heat on summer evenings if you open the window but draw the curtains and block direct sun BTW)

9. Make draft excluders to put at the bottom of doors (if you can't make them roll up old spare curtains which work just as well). Alternatively get long length curtains and put a rail up above a door to allow you to draw the curtains when the door is not being used, but which allows you to get enough clearance when the curtains are open to open the door (particularly good for doors to the outside (i.e. particuarly glass panelled doors)) which blocks a lot of heat.

Just a few of our tricks.
lizzie44

Also apart from the excellent suggestions already mentioned can I add a couple ? I always use thermal insoles in my shoes and riding boots,they really help and cost very little. Good old hotty bottles are invalauble either downstairs on the sofa or in bed and i always wear socks at night as i get very cold feet and cant go to sleep until my feet are toasty. Love Lizzie
Elizabeth

MrsWW wrote:
Serious tip now - if you don't cover your windscreen before you go to bed - DO IT!  

Last few mornings I've been using a windscreen cover that I got for Chrimbo - you spend no time using blowers/wipers etc to clear the screen so therefore save battery power.


What do you do with the cover when you take it off?
MrsWW

If I can, peg it on the line, if I can't - give it a good shake and lay it out on the rear shelf of the car - is usually dry by the end of the day when it's needed again.

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