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bodger

Smoking

I've been cold smoking cheese and bacon in the little BBQ/Smoker that I bought a few weeks ago. The friends that I've given the food to have been enthusiastic and have said that I should do it commercially. Although this is most unlikely, I did Google 'smokers' and ever since then, this page has been coming up whenever I've gone onto facebook.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00462...S&dra_hfr=x&dra_ohs=48-72

The brickets that you have to use with most of the models that are being pushed are hellishly expensive. Can the machines in the adverts really be that commercial?
Toddy

Galgael does it all the time with the offcuts and shavings from the stuff they make from old oak whisky barrels

They smoked food in the past, and they didn't have high priced briquettes to do it with.

M
midlandsman

It's a very expensive way of cold smoking. Whilst I can see it's popularity for small scale commercial use, as I guess that it would make it easy to get EHO approval, I'd have thought that a (food grade) stainless steel box and grids with a large ProQ CSG would be cheaper long term.

Others on here are better placed to advise on the best grade of stainless but IIRC both 304 and 316 should be fine.

HTH

MM
hughesy

Before you dive into buying stuff have a look into the rules and regs. I'm sure I read somewhere that temperature control is required for cold smoking. I might be wrong but I'm sure there's more to it than just smoking it if you're going to sell the product.
Gareth

Not just temperature control, but an annual calibration is also required, and food grade 316 stainless wherever raw meat is involved.

In a commercial situation, I recall that the cold smoking has to be done in a temperature controlled environment that is between 4*C and 8*C for raw meats and fish items, machines such as the Bradley would have to have the temperature checked and recalibrated, and a certificate issued each year, either by a service engineers visit or by sending the whole unit to an approved calibration centre.


John, you are in need of professional help.


Talk to your local food standards people and the Welsh Rural Development Agency (or whatever they are called these days), that is what they are there for, and being where your are there just might even be grant aid available.................I know there is none available over this side of the country because when I applied for it here in Norfolk, all £4 million of the regional allocation had all been given to the local biomass power stations to change the light bulbs in their offices to low energy ones.
midlandsman

I'm guessing that standards will be very different for new operations than they are for existing traditional outfits.

Gareth wrote:
...and food grade 316 stainless wherever raw meat is involved.


Many thanks Gareth, is there a guide that you can advise with the specs for different applications?

MM
bodger

I did some shop bought bacon for my own consumption on Saturday and it tasted divine. I used a small amount of hickory wood dust in my pro smoker . I didn't use that much and it burnt for hours and hours. I also stuck some mature cheddar in at the same time and the result with that was very good too. I think I'm going to stick at doing it for family and friends as an interesting hobby. Those bricket things worked out at close on seventeen quid for 16 hours smoking.
bodger

There's a brilliant little article in the latest British Pig Association magazine that I wish I could share with you but there would a slight matter of copy write to consider. It really is a good one and it looks at food smoking, curing hams and all the sort of things that we're interested in and would be well woth getting hold of a copy if you can.
midlandsman

Images and info on  Ole Hansen-Lydersen's smokehouse,  a recent addition to the Stoke Newington area of London, show that you can still start a food business using equipment that's not from specialist suppliers.

It gives a glimmer of hope for the future.

added 17.10: You'll also find a long thread about a guy setting up a business using equipment available to the small producer - Bradley, CSG etc over at sausagemaking.org:

http://forum.sausagemaking.org/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=2778

HTH

MM
Woodburner

I always thought cold smoking was a relative thing, as in, not as hot as hanging in the smoke over a fire,  not actually cold as in, minutely warmer than a fridge.    
bodger

There's obviously lots of regulations with food production but it does make you wonder. HFW stuck his home made side of bacon high up in his chimney for five days and that sort of home smoking has obviously gone on for centuries.

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