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Jonty

Scraping the bottle of the barrel

Literally........

This is a new experiment for me.  It's a method of harvesting yeast from bottle conditioned beer (ie with yeasty sediment in the bottom of the bottle). The reasoning behind it is that I'm making some beer similar to Hop Back Summer Lightning this week, and as their beer is bottled with yeast still in it, I thought I'd try and use some of the actual yeast that the brewery use when I try and replicate their brew.

Anyway, I had to try this - the method has the best instruction I've ever read in a recipe..

The yeast in the bottle is dormant, it's made alcohol by consuming all the available sugar in the beer, so to get it going, you need to make up a sugary solution, this is dry malt extract, pretty much the dried verion of the stuff in beer kits, it's very sugary and when mixed with water smells just like horlicks



A few spoons mixed with water and simmered for 10 mins



Into a jar to cool down a bit



When it's cooled, take a bottle conditioned beer and empty glass



Fill glass, leaving the last half inch in the bottle (where the sediment is)



Then it's a case of shaking up the sediment from the bottle and adding it to the sugary solution to give the yeast something to munch on



Then, the best instruction I've ever read in a recipe......

. ''Then, drink the contents of the glass''

#

Hopefully the yeast will kick off, I've never tried this before so I'm interested to see how it turns out
Butterbean

It makes perfect sense that it would work.  I talked to a guy who has kept a certain whiskey yeast alive for years - or so he said.  Apparantly it was a proprietary yeast that was good and he heard they were taking it off the market so he did the same as you.  I think he said he stored it in the fridge.
Bazzer

Is the sediment from only one bottle enough?
bodger

Woodsmoke

Nice one, matey! Looking forward to hearing how it turns out..............

Like BB, can't see why it shouldn't work. Some sourdough starters are kept alive fro years, too  
Butterbean

Bazzer wrote:
Is the sediment from only one bottle enough?


As long as it is fed with proper sugar and nutrients it will continue to multiply and divide.  21 divisions is over a million and they do this numerous times in a day.  I think the amount will have more of an influence on the time it takes to ferment a batch.  It might add a few days.  I was short some yeast and used only a quarter what I was "supposed to" in a 30 gallon batch and it only took a couple more days to reach the desired ABV.
Jonty

Thanks Chaps,

Bazzer, according to the king of home brewing - Graham Wheeler, the one bottle should suffice, however, I do like your rationale and next time will maybe erm, quaff some back up bottles as well.

BB, how the hell do you harvest yeast from Whiskey?  I suppose you'd have to have access to it at the mash stage
Butterbean

Jonty wrote:
BB, how the hell do you harvest yeast from Whiskey?  I suppose you'd have to have access to it at the mash stage


I don't know how one would do it in the US since it is impossible to safely make it unless you buy a $25,000 permit and pay a small monthly gratuity for the privelege of making it which somehow makes it safe.  I don't know how this works but I think it works on the same principle selling carbon credits eliminates global warming.  However, when I go to Sweden or New Zealand I've seen them basically make a very strong wine with some yeast modifications and then simmer out the color.  The dregs in the bottom of the barrel is ripe with yeast and if you are making continuous runs you can just dip some of this out to inobulate other batches.  Some people pour the dregs into the still but I'm of the opinion good in is good out and vice versa.
Woodsmoke

Butterbean wrote:

I don't know how one would do it in the US since it is impossible to safely make it unless you buy a $25,000 permit and pay a small monthly gratuity for the privelege of making it


Too true, BB. I've actually heard experts say that unless you have this 'permit' you'll go blind!

Here in the UK we have a widespread net of 'spirit spies' who's business it is to ensure we all stay safe & sighted...................god bless them, I say. If it weren't for them we'd all be swigging poorly-made moonshine (completely with dead rat to lend body) as apparently we're all too stupid to research the process.....................

Having said that, as you point out it's illegal in some parts of the world. I'm pretty sure that's the only thing keeping most of us alive  

Praise your Fearless Leaders, & give grateful thanks to those who would keep our morals up, say I
Jonty

It Lives    

I'm very pleased!!  The bubbles in the previous pictures are where I've shaken the flask to aerriate it, the bubbles in this one are CO2 as the yeast has woken up and started munching on the sugar in the solution.



I was hoping to get a brew on tomorrow but I'm not sure if the started would be ready by then, I might put this one down as a practice and start the next one a a few days earler.
Butterbean

Maybe if we put our heads together we could figure out how to take the yeast and dry it properly so it can be packaged and stored for later use.  I'm thinking that if you build the numbers up good and then drop some rice or bran hulls in the mix and spread it out so it can dry.

Or would this cause blindness too?
Butterbean

Woodsmoke, the dead rat statement got me thinking.  Is this why so many people go ratting over there?  Are these used in scotch and irish whiskey making?  
Woodsmoke

Only because we can't get raccoons, mate  

Black rats lend body, but the brown rat has a more subtle influence on the overall bouquet. Depending on the blend, squirrels are sometimes used, but purists turn up their noses at that practice
Jonty

Butterbean wrote:
Woodsmoke, the dead rat statement got me thinking.  Is this why so many people go ratting over there?  Are these used in scotch and irish whiskey making?  


BB,

I think you'll find that the only rats involved in the whisk industry over here are the ones in whitehall who keep putting the duty up on it!!
Jonty

Butterbean wrote:
Maybe if we put our heads together we could figure out how to take the yeast and dry it properly so it can be packaged and stored for later use.  I'm thinking that if you build the numbers up good and then drop some rice or bran hulls in the mix and spread it out so it can dry.

Or would this cause blindness too?


There's obviously a way mate, as that's how most of our yeast comes from the home brew shop.  I must admit though, I am tempted to go to the brewery in my town and see if I could get a small amount of their live yeast for next time I make a copy of their beer.......
Butterbean

I have a very good friend who is a fiendish criminal who by day has a lab and professes to teach our college students alchemy and other vile sciences but by the light of the moon he is a conjurer of spirits.  I'll ask him what he thinks and maybe he'll have an idea of how to do it without blinding us or making odd appendages sprout from various parts of our bodies.  May not get a specific answer but at least will get some good ideas of the principles neccessary to accomplish this.
Jonty

I did see this wonderous piece of plumbing on my travels recently.  I believe it to be some form of spirit conjuring device

Woodsmoke

Butterbean wrote:
May not get a specific answer


As long as he gives us enough to get a specific gravity, I'm sure we'll be more than happy  
Butterbean

Nice!  That must have been taken in Sweden since the worm would be wrapped counter clockwise in New Zealand.  Coriolus Effect.

Here is a little something I saw during my last trip to New Zealand - or was it Sweden.  Wherever it was the people must be lazy or something cause you'd think they'd polish it and make it all shiny and all so everyone could see it but at at least they had  the presence of mind to put the car bumper on the lid to keep the trash and dust out of the kettle.  Or maybe they are too stingy to buy an ample supply of Kmet to give it a proper cleaning.   Am still confused as to why they have such a marvelous piece of craftsmanship stuck back in the bushes and not properly displayed for all to see.

Woodsmoke

What a shame! That'd look lovely with a bit of Duraglit, that would    

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