Archive for Over the Gate Join in for a friendly chat over the gate about home and country matters. (Nominated Charity The British Heart Foundation)
 


       Over the Gate Forum Index -> Recipes
Diz

Salami

Salami making is so easy and very rewarding (as long as you can leave them alone long enough to mature properly!!!!!!
They can be fine tuned to your taste and experimented with, to get superb results.

Hard ware.
Accurate scales. Meat mincer and sausage stuffer. Butchers string. Big plastic boxís (it makes life easy to mix than a bowl)

Basic Ingredients
Lean Pork (shoulder). Back Fat (the firm white fat between meat and skin on a good chop). Ox bungs. (natural beef intestines for the casings). Salt

Other Ingredients
Paprika, sweet and smoked. Garlic. Cyan pepper. Whole pepper corns. Red wine. Acidophilus.( from the Chemist or health shop. Optional)

Swig Wine to make sure it fit for purpose! Soak your Ox Bungs in clean water and rinse them through. (They usually come salted) Put back fat into freezer for an hour to firm up. Cut into Pea size pieces. Swig wine.
Mince the lean meat into a big plastic box. Add fat. I started with a ratio of 25% fat to 75% meat. Mix up and add more fat if you donít think it looks right. Split mix in Half If going to try other mixes. Add a good table spoon each of  sweet and smoked Paprika. Mix. Add more if it doesnít look right. Add lots of crushed Garlic. I worked on double the amount I like in a dish. Swig wine. Mix and adjust Paprika if needed. Add Cyan Pepper to desired heat. Mix again. Once your happy with the colour, smell, add a good slosh of Red Wine to loosen it up. Mix again.
This is the only critical part of the process. Weigh your mix. You then need to add 2 point 2%(2.2) Salt to your mix. This cures the mix and lets it mature for long periods of time without any form of refrigeration.  Swig leftover Wine and mix thoroughly.
Acidophilus can be added now if you want at this point. This promotes a harmless fungal growth on your Salamis which helps protect them from insects as they cure. Add half a teaspoon per half Kilo of mix. If you have any worries about Acidophilus talk to your chemist about it.
The other half of the mix, all as above and I add whole black Pepper Corns.


Load the sausage stuffer with skin and leave about 2 cm hanging over. Tie an overhand knot, trapping the skin. Loop back the loose skin towards the rest of the skin on the stuffer and tie another overhand knot trapping the loose skin. Cut off string. Fill the skin so the salami is about 30cm long and 5 cm thick. Pinch the end of the skin and tie an overhand knot trapping the skin and leave about 10cm tails on the string. Cut skin, leaving 2 cm overhang. Loop overhang back up the Salami and tie another overhand knot trapping the loose skin. Tie an overhand knot at the end of the string tails forming a hanging loop. Your first Salami! Swig Wine.
Once all Salami have been done, hang in the Kitchen overnight to redden and dry off.

Find somewhere breezy to hang them. A porch or shed will be good. Hang them for about 8 weeks before the squidge test. Take one down and the first thing that you will notice is the size has shrunk. The Salt Will have cured the meat to about half its thickness. The smell will start to make you drool. It should have a good coating of white furry fungi. Squidge between finger and thumb. It should be firm but not hard.
Next comes the taste test. Wipe fungus off with a bit of kitchen role, slice thinly, consume. The skin is edible even with the fungus on. But I think it is a little metallic tasting and peel it off. Once you have congratulated your self, open a bottle of Wine and finish off the Salami and then phone everyone to tell them of your success.
A word of caution now. Never, Never offer guests a piece of your homemade Salami. You will not get rid of them! We have even had a Vegetarian come back for more.

The quality of the Pork and Fat that go into the Salami will determine the end taste. We are lucky to be able to look out of the kitchen window and see what our Pork is up to. If you donít have this luxury, try and source Rare Breed Pork. Ours were Gloster Old Spot. But other Rare breeds are as tasty. The RBs take longer to mature compared to commercial breeds and will reflect the quality of there diet in their meat and fat. It sounds odd in this fat free day and age to be talking of tasty fat. But once you try it , you will be converted.  

Slainte  
Diz
[/img]
[img]
[img]
[/img]
[img][/img]
Big Phil

Nice one.
I have tried before and failed.
Now will try again, keep recipes coming!
debbie

Ido something very similar for chorizo using smoked paprika, garlic and red wine - 2% salt and as it will be eaten raw potassium nitrate. (don't use it for anything that will be cooked eg bacon etc but only for air dried)  For the chorizo I dice all the meat and fat and don't use minced as i think it gives a better texture to the chorizo.  Will have a go with your salami recipe
Diz

Never thought of diceing the meat. Will have to give that one a try.Thanks
Slainte
Diz
debbie

its a boring job but worth it. I will try the mincing for salami though asI think a lit of salami have a different texture and are more close grained in any case.
Diz

Just been informed by herself, that our mincer plate is a coarse one. We got this instead of the fine one as the sausage here is a bit like pink mush. So we didnt want to replicate the sorry piece of culinary f f f f failure!
I would think if the minced meat was to fine, the Salami would pack down to much. Thus making it quite hard and chewy.
Slainte
Diz
bodger

You've come good for us as promised Diz. Thanks very much.

       Over the Gate Forum Index -> Recipes
Page 1 of 1
Create your own free forum | Buy a domain to use with your forum