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bodger

Pigs and electric fences.

A very simple question. How many strands and at what heights to keep a sow in her enclosure? My new pig, when she arrives, does already know what an electric fence is and I need to keep her where she should be.
Some how, over the years I've managed to collect three mains electric fencing units and she'll have the power from one of them all to herself.
rhino

I've used as little as 2 about 2'6" high but have also needed stock fencing 3'6" high with barbed wire top and bottom and 3 strands of electric in front at foot intervals.    The ones I've got at the minute show little interest in getting out, and yesterday someone, (the guy who rents from me) had borrowed some pallets which were bolstering the gate, leaving one pallet unsecured (just leaning) against adjacent fencing to hold them in. They were milling near but none challenged it and there are one or two bits that normally I'd be worried about that the pigs ignore. On the other hand I had some that were out every ten minutes and a Berkshire boar that would be there for breakfast then raid the next door farm, but be there on time for tea, so I had no idea he was getting out till the farmer came over to shout at me  
What I'm trying to say is it depends but if she's used to it and isn't a female Houdini the first statement will probably be ok.  
Exciting isn't it
hughesy

We generally use two strands about 12 inches and 18 inches. Never had problems with adult pigs but youngsters can be more curious and some seem to learn that the fence is only an irritation and push through sometimes.
sandrar

With weaners we use three when then small and then remove the one nearest to the ground as they get older, so two should work.
debbie

we use two - the highest being about knee high.  With the adults we have found that it usually takes about three days for them to twig that its not on the youngster are quicker on the uptake - we had one litter that even worked out that if they toosed the rubber bucket over the fence they could run across that......they were finished surprisingly early compared to what we usually do!
rhino

Debbie wrote
Quote:
they were finished surprisingly early compared to what we usually do!


 
hughesy

We had a gilt who's one ear had not flopped forward like it should and she could see a lot more around her than most Saddlebacks. She was very inquisitive and if there was ever trouble she was at the head of it. I once caught her standing with her nose just millimetres from the fence wire, timing the pulses, rocking backwards and forwards slightly until she was in tune with the fence pulse, then picked her moment and just walked through it! I gave up in the end and had to put her in a stock fenced pen, she just had no respect for the electric.
debbie

hughesy wrote:
We had a gilt who's one ear had not flopped forward like it should and she could see a lot more around her than most Saddlebacks. She was very inquisitive and if there was ever trouble she was at the head of it. I once caught her standing with her nose just millimetres from the fence wire, timing the pulses, rocking backwards and forwards slightly until she was in tune with the fence pulse, then picked her moment and just walked through it! I gave up in the end and had to put her in a stock fenced pen, she just had no respect for the electric.


Been there on that one - we now use pulsors with an eratic pulse so they can't do it any more!
darkbrowneggs

I had six Iron Age weaners one year, which kept getting out.  

They were in an electric netting enclosure.  I watched them escape at only a few weeks old.  

The biggest male picked up the un-electified bottom wire in his mouth and held it up as the others ran under, their hairy backs giving good insulation from the shock, then before they were all through he dropped it and ran under whilst it was still up on the others backs.  Clever or what.

They were next to the lawn and wild boar types don't dig - they plough, you can imagine what six can do in even a short while.
rhino

The Berkshire boar I had, just wasn't bothered by electric, I've watched him feeding with his back leg touching a strand and the muscle jumping at each shock.  
debbie

Our Boar has decided that electric fencing doesn't apply to him either - been fine for years but thislast six months HE decides when its time to move in with a new wife!
bodger

Oh Bugger !  Does it work for any pigs? It looks as though I might be getting some unwanted exercise keeping them in.
debbie

DBodger - you get the odd litter that are a pain - we have probably only had 3 litters like this in 10 years - otherwise they are fine.  the trick is to train them to the fencing from birth.  We used to have what we called the training pen which basically had netting round it with the electric fence at snout height (for the piglets) inside it - the pigs could, if they really wanted to get through it but they got one hell of a belt as they tried because the netting slowed them down - they never tried more than two or three times and after that they respected the two lines of electric fencing for the rest of their lives.  We don't have to worry about this now as all our pens in the woods are stocked fenced as well as electric
Slipster

Would this be big enough..... this is mine that i use for the sheep.... but i have thought about the pigs
http://www.agrisellex.co.uk/elect...electric-fence-energiser-n50.html
debbie

its not the power of the energiser Slipster its more the fact that a pig won't back off once its started running forward so snout hits they get a shock and carry on running they get a brief shock across the back as they go - thats what they get used to and thats what you want to avoid.  if however they have a brief barrier that slows them down so they get a real belt - they will keep on running then but next time they know the wire and won't even touch it.  with our adults (except the General Lee Our boar and this is a recent thing with him) you can actually take the fence down for three days and they won't cross the line where the fence used to be.  Mind you if it works for elephants......
hughesy

Our adult pigs are fine with electric, like Debbie says you get the odd ones that are wise to it. They do need to be trained to it at an early age. Having said that our boar was two when we got him and he'd never seen leccy fence before but after a few weeks in a stock fenced pen with a wire round the inside he's been fine. Won't cross the line now even when the fence has been taken down, unless he's got his snout in a bucket!
bodger

Thats the pig run done, we finished it this afternoon.
























I'm sweating now on being able to locate a second hand pig ark locally.
debbie

That looks seriously good John - and pig proof
horace

 
Digindeep

Looking good, fair bit of back work went into that..

It will be nice and fertile for planting out next season  

Gotta think of them there vedges  
sod

Great job I agree with Dd will be great vege garden  
darkbrowneggs

That is looking excellent  

The best and biggest cauliflowers I ever grew was following pigs, they were bigger than footballs   and the purple sprouting was nearly 5 ft tall

If you get really stuck for an ark then a few bales with some corrugated over the top and weighted down will last for a bit, especially when they are small
rhino

Looks good and for an arc I would suggest pallets but against that they'd look scruffy  
12Bore

Good looking job there!
Slipster


I used small straw bales at first with an old door on the top and more bales on top of that... worked really good until I found an Ark
bodger

I've just priced small bale straw and they want over £4.00 a piece for them.
rhino

How much    they're about two quid here and that made me blanche.
Pallets and a cheap tarpaulin it is then  
I made one the other day to give mine an option, I've got some 8'x5' pallets so 2 of them one for the back one for the roof a couple of smaller ones for the sides and two at the front to leave a gap. All swathed in a cheap blue tarp. Not immensely warm but wind proof.
They've used it twice preferring the leaky draughty cold tin arc that's on it's last legs.  
That's the next job renovate that and stuff straw between the pallets to insulate it a bit.
debbie

rhino wrote:
How much    they're about two quid here and that made me blanche.
Pallets and a cheap tarpaulin it is then  
I made one the other day to give mine an option, I've got some 8'x5' pallets so 2 of them one for the back one for the roof a couple of smaller ones for the sides and two at the front to leave a gap. All swathed in a cheap blue tarp. Not immensely warm but wind proof.
They've used it twice preferring the leaky draughty cold tin arc that's on it's last legs.  
That's the next job renovate that and stuff straw between the pallets to insulate it a bit.


Yep.  We bought, second hand, a fantastic ark real heavy gage metal and solid wood floor.  they used it two bnights then all decamped next door to the old ark with no floor and open fronted - all preferred to bundle in that.

We once made an ark out of straw......lesson learnt.  never make a house out of dinner - it lasted two days - the weaners were fine but the sow ate it!
hughesy

 never make a house out of dinner ![/quote]

Hehe. Ours usually like to carry the straw in and out of the arks and arrange it just how they want it. Not sure how that would work if the straw was the house!
nickthechick

We had a boar at my old work where he would jump the radials to get to the sows getting served that week he was a nutter so we caged him in. but we had two strands of fencing there.
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