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bodger

Iris's?

The one's you get in gardens and the one's you get around ponds and in marshes? They must be related but are they the same thing?
Toddy

Do you mean the yellow flag iris ?
They grow around the lochs here, down the burn, and I grow them in my garden too. They're useful for basketry as well as being pretty

The other, purple ones are different varieties. I miss the big huge open flowered heavily scented ones. They don't seem to like things quite as wet as the yellow ones.

M
bodger

We have the yellow Flag Iris around our pond but last year we bought a couple variations from a water garden centre. They've survived the relocation but by the looks of it, they aren't going to flower this year.
We mentioned this to a friend and she said that we could have some from her garden. Now the flowers on the two are similar but the one's on offer are definitely of the garden variety and some how, I can't see them growing in swampy marshy areas.
Yorkshire Geordie

These are seen in our neck of the woods regularly - mainly by the River Otter.

Is yours like this Bodger?

This is an extract from http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/o...iris/growing-flag-iris-plants.htm which describes them:-.
"Flag irises are very hardy perennial plants that survive with minimal care and generally bloom in the spring and early summer. Flag irises are most often found in wet, low-lying areas and are suitable for similar conditions in the home garden. There are many varieties of flag irises, including dwarf and tall types. The most common types of flag iris plants familiar to most people include blue flag iris and yellow flag iris.

   Blue Flag Iris Blue flag iris (Iris versicolor) is a beautiful semi-aquatic plant. Deep green foliage and striking blue-violet flowers appear on 2- to 3-foot stalks in late spring to early summer. Leaves are narrow and sword-shaped. There are many species of blue flag iris and native plants are found along the edges of swamps, wet meadows, stream banks or in forested wetlands. This hardy plant adapts well to the home garden and is very easy to grow.
   Yellow Flag Iris Yellow flag iris (Iris pseudacorus) is a perennial plant that is native to Europe, North Africa, Great Britain and the Mediterranean area. Yellow flag iris is prevalent all over North America, apart from the Rocky Mountains. Generally found along wetlands, streams, rivers or lakes in shallow mud or water, this hardy plant will also tolerate drier soil and high soil acidity. Gardeners who often use this iris as an ornamental pond plant value the yellow flowers that bloom in the summer. However, it can quickly become invasive, and gardeners must beware of this in order to provide the most appropriate flag iris care.
"
Martyn
Toddy

This is the purple iris that thrives in my sodden wet clay Lanarkshire garden.



and this is the basket I last made from it's leaves



M
Rena

Beautiful basket Toddy!! I had no idea you could make baskets from iris'! Well done! The plant is quite beautiful in its live state too!
sod

WOW as we live and learn never knew that all beautiful, we have just been given some and about to plant will be in different place as didn't know they lik wet thank you all    
bodger

Last summer Karen and I called at this place and purchased two unusual coloured iris's to plant in our garden ponds margins.

http://www.kenchesterwatergardens.co.uk/

One of them has been flowering for the last couple of days. From memory, this variety is called black cock.









Yorkshire Geordie

Very nice to look at Bodger.  
You'll be well pleased with them I'll bet.
Martyn
bodger

The one that hasn't flowered so far, is supposed to be a butter milk coloured one.

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