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attheshorts

coal dust

after cleaning the coal bunker out ended up with 2 bags full of the stuff.any body got any idears too do with it don't want to dump it.(Tight old get)
Yorkshire Geordie

This is a site with an answer for you:-

http://www.blog.freebustravel.co.uk/economising-on-coal/

It use walpaper paste to bind the dust into briquettes using plastic plant pots as a mould.




Martyn
Toddy

I was about to say, "briquettes"
Folks used to just roll the coal dust up in sheets of damp newspaper. Wrapped them tightly like logs and stack them beside the fire to dry off.
They were used to keep a fire going once it was down to embers. It used up the dust and small crumbs without putting the fire out by putting it on in shovel loads or just burning it off too quickly and to no good use….and it flares badly when you do that anyway.

Wallpaper paste and moulded ? Sounds practical I'm pretty sure they used to use sawdust too for the ones that that coalman sold. My Mum never bought them but I saw neighbours buy those wee square briquettes. Our next door neighbour used to put two on the fire last thing at night and they kind of smouldered away so that the hot air warmed the upstairs rooms and the fire was easily brought alight in the morning. About 6 x 6 x 4" blocks seemed to be the usual size.

M
welshboy

In Wales coal dust was mixed with clay to make balls about the size if  a good egg and it was called pele. I lifted this narrative
Pel is the Welsh word for ball, and pele is the plural. What we did was to go to the fields nearby and dig out some clay. If it had a blue tinge to it that was what we wanted. The small coal and clay were mixed together as concrete is mixed. It was hard work as the clay was very lumpy. So we would don a pair of garden clogs and tread the clay into the coal, wetting it at the same time. We then formed it into balls and lay them out to dry and harden. They were then ready for the fire.



Usually just after tea, around 5 pm, my Father would pile them on the fire, making sure he put sufficient on to last the night. They took quite a time to burn properly, and as we sat around the fireplace we would gradually have to move away as the pele began to throw out the heat, until everyone was as far away as we could get. It would last far until the night. Next morning there would be huge pile of dust to be cleared, which was the clay.



  I see references to culm made the same way http://www.sip.ie/sip019B/bumbs/bumbs.htm
Toddy

That was an interesting read Welshboy   Thanks for that
welshboy

Toddy wrote:
That was an interesting read Welshboy   Thanks for that

No problem Sharing info is why we are here.
I like the idea of the glue but wonder if it would burn and lose the cementing value so the coal dust runs through th grate not fully burned ?
Toddy

I was wondering about the sawdust addition. Lignin in wood can be awfully useful, but would it bind the slack fine if dampened and compressed I think.
Wallpaper paste is probably another possibility (poundstore stuff is certainly cheap enough to give it a try )

See post 14 in this thread on CR4
http://cr4.globalspec.com/thread/.../Coal-Dust-Binder-for-Briquetting
where a fellow from China says it's easy to bind the stuff.

M
sod

Here we used to get 'brickets' which were coal dust and sawdust compressed into an egg shape with a ridge aronnd sides where the two sides of the press shape came together. Were great burning and lasted well at night.
Christine

We used to live on a beach where sea coal appeared (washed out of a local mine) and we used the dust to bank the fire for the night. Useful as we had a back boiler and hot water next morning.
Mo

Christine wrote:
We used to live on a beach where sea coal appeared (washed out of a local mine) and we used the dust to bank the fire for the night. Useful as we had a back boiler and hot water next morning.


Snap   I remember my Grandad using coal dust to bank the fire at night.
12Bore

Mo wrote:
Christine wrote:
We used to live on a beach where sea coal appeared (washed out of a local mine) and we used the dust to bank the fire for the night. Useful as we had a back boiler and hot water next morning.


Snap   I remember my Grandad using coal dust to bank the fire at night.

We did this when I was a lad.
attheshorts

wall paper paste sounds good but it costs money.How about flour and water cheap and sticks stuff but would it dry out?

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