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darkbrowneggs

Bloat in Dogs

hi - Just thought I would post this just in case it might help someone

I keep Danes and they can be very suscesptible to bloat, so I this is what I have learned.  My last two made nearly 12 and nearly 13 which is a good age for a giant breed

I generally feed meat (its not all that expensive if you buy in bulk and store in the freezer)  then veg and scraps etc. but make sure there is no possiblity of any "fermenting" type stuff which might start to work in their tums - I don't think dogs can belch.  And I would never soak anything containing grain type stuff to feed them just in case

Never feed then give exercise afterwards - a large stomach bag full of food can so easily twist. This includes having rough games after a meal with a puppy or young dog

At any time if there are excessive tummy sounds I regard that as a warning symptom, and I would always stay with the dog to monitor the situation and certainly either have the dog with me overnight or spend the night with the dog.  If symptoms then start developing the dog becomes uncomfortable and restless, and will begin grunting and groaning and turning round or when things get bad pace trying to get comfortable

BUT before any of the sypmtoms get this far I ALWAYS give homoeopathic Carbo veg.  - you can get it over the internet from Ainsworths of London, don't buy from an ordinary chemist - the remedies they sell are completely ineffecitve.

If I am worried I would dose as often as every 10 or 15 mins in the beginning,  then watching the symptoms, adjust the regularity of the dose.  

The rumbling in the tum is the main signal to watch for.

Apparently with bloat once it is going you have around 20mins to do something, which doesnt give you much time to get it attended to by a vet.

Anyway it has worked with my dogs, so I thought I would like to share.
madmac

Really usefuladvice.
As the owner of too many running dogs I am very awareof the risk of bloat. The rescues generally advise no exercise 30 mins before or after any meals. Difficult with a pup on numerous meals a day. Also aslurchers/running dogs are excellent counter surfers (thieves ) you don't always know when the sweeties have eaten.
sod

Thank you verymuch for that had never heard of bloat in dogs before so now will be crazy watching with ours.
darkbrowneggs

madmac wrote:
Really usefuladvice.
As the owner of too many running dogs I am very awareof the risk of bloat. The rescues generally advise no exercise 30 mins before or after any meals. Difficult with a pup on numerous meals a day. Also aslurchers/running dogs are excellent counter surfers (thieves ) you don't always know when the sweeties have eaten.


I am not sure a few sweeties or stolen scraps would be a problem.

I think it is stuff that starts to fement, and also when there is a twist in the gut.  Large meals can cause a problem, and of course big or hard working dogs need to eat a lot.  The theory goes to feed in smaller lots, but once my dogs are full grown they only have one meal a day but that is in the evening, and if they are young then a bit later in the evening so they won't be active after eating.  The big problem with late feeding then letting them go straight to bed is that if problems do arise you won't be about to "hear" what is going on

I got my first Dane in 1969 and lost him at 6 to bloat but didn't even realise what it was he was just dead when I got up in the morning, and my second at 3 after she had her evening meal, then a visitor had a pulling game with her, which the dog loved and a good time was had by all.  Not long after she asked to go out, and put herself to bed (she had an outside run at the time)  

I won't go on .... too painful..... but lessons learnt ...... and haven't lost one since   Thank God  

Wiki says this

Gastric dilatation volvulus (also known as bloat or a twisted stomach) is a medical condition in which the stomach becomes overstretched by excessive gas content. It is also commonly referred to as torsion and gastric torsion when the stomach is also twisted. The word bloat is often used as a general term to cover gas distension of the stomach with or without twisting.

The name comes from the Middle English blout, meaning soft or puffed, which is from the Old Norse blautr, meaning soft or soaked.[1] Meteorism, its name derived from the writings of Hippocrates, is now rarely used in English. The condition occurs most commonly in domesticated animals, especially ruminants and certain dog breeds.

In dogs, gas accumulation in the stomach is usually associated with volvulus of the stomach, which prevents gas from escaping. Deep-chested breeds are especially at risk. Mortality rates in dogs range from 10 to 60 percent, even with treatment.[2] With surgery, the mortality rate is 15 to 33 percent.[3]


This is another rather scary link, but its always best to be forewarned of problems, at least it gives one the chance to make and informed decision.  Wish I had know then what I know now.  

http://www.greatdaneowners.co.uk/...t-symptoms-different-experiences/
freckle

GDV is mainly a problem in large deep chested breeds of dog-so your Great Danes, Weimaraners, Standard Poodles, Dobermans, GSDs, Setters, Pointers, Rotties etc. The size and shape of the dog permits more mobility of the stomach so whereas a dog with less of a deep chest may suffer from dilatation (bloat) it doesn't have as much of an ability to rotate.
sod

Our working dogs have always been fed when work day is over so they eat n settle down. But have to say they have always lived in the house too Don't think I have ever seen them belch but they sure can fert    so wind should come out Cattle get bloat because the can't do either
sapphire

Very useful advice - thank you DBE  

Perhaps this could be made a sticky? & maybe other problems could be posted about & could have a dog/horse/chicken ailment  useful info sticky area? Just a thought? as maybe helpful to people who suspect a problem & it is quick & easy to find rather than looking through search engine.
debbie

Good advice DBE and something that we are always on the look out for jut in cae - also look for anyform of projectile vomiting as this is another sign.

When our danes become adults we feed a third in the morning and two thirds at night before bed - usually around 10pm.  with just a couple of biscuits or a slice of toast and marmite at lunch time. people think thats late to feed but the dog is less active then.  Even little Solly doesn't get his last meal until 8pm and has his breakfast at 6.30am so he is happy to go back to bed afterwards.

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