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debbie

air dried ham

a bit of a follow on from Woodsmokes post in the kitchen table sectionI was thinking that there must be loads of ways of air drying a ham and I just wondered how everyone did theirs?

I don't bury mine in salt but I am not using a traditional method I suppose.  I tunnel bone as far as the knee joint then use as I do for bacon (with the addition of potassium nitrate in this case) with 150g of cure per kg of meat.  I divide the total cure in half.  apply one half of the cure inside and out, wrap tightly in cling film and leave in the fridge for 14 days.  remove from fridge and rinse inside and out, rub in remainder of cure to ourside only, re-wrap and refidgerate for another 14 days.  Remove from fridge rinse and rub with vinegar (outside only of course now), wrap in muslin smear any cut edges in lard and hang.  

I like to use 10% brown sugar in my cure and flavour with bay, juniper and course cracked pepper.  i tunnel bone for two reasons:  A) less chance of rotting - a pig rots from the bone out unlike beef that rots from the outside in - one of the reasons you can hang the carcass of a bullock for so lone and B) I have a heavy duty slicer and I just LOVE my parma style ham wafer, read a news paper through it, thin and I just can't acheive the same result with a bone in leg
Woodsmoke

I don't flavour mine, Debbie. Not even with peppercorns or anything in the cure. I quite like the idea of using brown sugar & bay though

I also don't lard mine until they've had the first cut taken off the 'open' end.

I tunnel bone for exactly the same reasons you do though. It makes it SO much easier to get those wafer-thin slices using the Berkel, & means the remainder can be hung back up until you want to use it again.

There's no denying a bone-in ham looks magnificent on a ham stand, but I imagine if you're not using a lot at a time it'd soon become a bit of a pain to have in the kitchen...................

Ahhhhhhh, ham  
Jonty

Debbie, that sounds very much like Franco's (sausagemaking.org) cure and method - I believe he only leaves his for a couple of months befor eating.  I assume that's down to the addition of cure 2 - I'd be interested to see how log you hang yours for.  

I'm almost loathed to say that I'm tempted to go against my normal principles and try a method I 've read about which uses salt only and only a relatively small amount.  But, was toying with doing a compare and contrast with another method at the same time.
debbie

same method no bought in cure though
Jonty

debbie wrote:
same method no bought in cure though


wouldn't expect anything less  

with the cure do you find the pork cures faster than with the equivalent  of what you're curing with your convetional bacon?

out of interest, here's franco's  "friendly" recipe for curing a leg - That I reckon anyone who was worried about curing a leg could give it a try

How to make a simple ‘Parma Ham’ at home.

Genuine Parma ham is one of Italy’s most famous food products and is often imitated, this method gives a faithful reproduction and is simple to follow but both the method and ingredients must be followed closely to avoid spoilage and food poisoning!

I have posted pics using a full ‘bone in’ leg but I would recommend first timers try with a smaller piece of pork to start with as the curing times will be less and if it all goes horribly wrong you won’t be too much out of pocket!

You will need

• 1 piece of pork. Leg, loin, or even belly will do.

• Cure mixture, I sell an all in one ‘Parma Ham’ cure that has the right amount of cure and seasonings http//www.sausagemaking.org/acatalog/Parma_Ham.html or you can make your own using the following

250 grammes Demerara sugar
350 grammes coarse sea salt
25 grammes cure 2 (alternative name Prague powder 2)
40 grammes coarse ground black pepper
10 grammes ground juniper berries
25 grammes ground garic powder

Total weight of cure is 700 grammes, this will cure 8 kilos of meat, ie use 87.5 grammes of cure per kilo of meat.


Method.

1.Chill the meat overnight


2.Rub the meat with half of the cure mixture, if using a boned joint ensure that the inner surface of the meat is properly coated, massage the cure into any crevices.


3.Wrap the meat tightly in cling film or seal in a Ziploc bag or vacuum pack and leave in the fridge for 15 days.



4.Unwrap the meat and repeat step 2 with the remaining cure mixture.

This picture was taken after the initial 15 day cure.

5. Leave the meat to cure for another 15 days.



6.Unwrap the meat and leave to soak in tepid water for half an hour.


7.hang the ham for 6 hours in a fridge or draughty cool room.



8.Hang the ham in a warm room for 3 days, (an airing cupboard is ideal).


9. Smear the meat side of the ham with a mixture of lard and black pepper.





10..Hang the ham for a minimum of 30 days at 15 degrees Celsius with a 70% relative humidity.




This leg was aged for 2 months as it still had the bone in, smaller joints may be cured and aged for a shorter length of time.





Finished article  




Franco

edited to say - taken from the RC site
Butterbean

Those sound wonderful.  I think making a ham is like making wine.  I love to try different methods and can't really say I have any one method I like best.  In general, I split the salt application and maybe let it equalize longer - usually about 45 days.  I don't wipe with lard but do sometimes give a heavy dusting of black pepper.  I think my favorite ham would be more of a sugar cured, honey or molasses version but I'm not to set on this either.  Sometimes I'll hang them in the attic where they get really hot during the summer months and they seem to get more of a nutty flavor when I do this but they also tend to get tougher to slice and some don't like this flavor.  I just like ham anyway you cure it. I'm looking for one that is just extraordinary but I've yet to find it.  It won't be long before the experiments will begin again.
Woodsmoke

I'll be really interested to hear what you think of the ham I've sent you, BB! I imagine it'll be a far more subtle flavour than the molasses or honey-cured hams though.
Butterbean

Can't wait to try it.  You did get the proper export permits and fees and taxes paid on it didn't you.   Don't want to be eating or drinking anything that has not been approved, stamped, inspected, measured, analyzed, poked, prodded, sampled by some government somewhere.
debbie

Ham is looking very good in the fridge.  We started it when Slipster and Ladyslip were with us and the second half of the cure is due to be applied this weekend.  Boned leg weight was 4kgs (with trotter still attached)  and it seems to be firming up nicely.  I didn't use as much sugar as Franco does in his recipe though.
Mo

Thanks Jonty  

and to everyone else, especially Debbie.
Jonty

debbie wrote:
Ham is looking very good in the fridge.  We started it when Slipster and Ladyslip were with us and the second half of the cure is due to be applied this weekend.  Boned leg weight was 4kgs (with trotter still attached)  and it seems to be firming up nicely.  I didn't use as much sugar as Franco does in his recipe though.


How log do you tend to hang them Debbie?  I'm interested in the cure 2 v salt options.
debbie

second half of the cure to be applied at the weekend then leave another two weeks....TBH Jonty absolutely no idea how long I am going to hang ot for...till its done I think!  I'll keep you posted though
Woodsmoke

Mine was at least 3 months before it was ready to eat. Temperature & humidity's very different up here though, so I've no idea how long yours will take, Debbie  

Incidentally, one of mine has been in the smoke for three days now, & it's looking beautiful
debbie

I am thinking at least four months hence starting it now.  we are very high and damp up here.  An idea to do another one though but hot smoke it slowly perhaps instead of air drying.  This was quite a small pig at around 50kgs carcass weight.  If I was to have done the same with the 70kg pig I butchered last weekend I think it would have taken a lot longer to air dry!

When I was at river cottage a few weeks ago and they were showing me round it was interesting to see their hams and salami air drying - and they use no nitrates/its whtsoever.  EH are happy for them to serve them at their events but they are not allowed to sell them in their deli.
Jonty

I found this site today - it gives an idea of how the 'professionals' do it.  I reckon it'd be difficult to improve on something you've made yourself though.

http://www.prosciuttodiparma.com/eng/info/making/

I have a description of a technique very similar to this which is what I was planning on trying myself (apart from for 'temperature controlled room' read garage!!).
debbie

In my case its a spare room Intersting that they don't appear to bury in salt though
Jonty

debbie wrote:
Intersting that they don't appear to bury in salt though


I read that they term parma ham a sweet ham.

My butcher has some of his own pigs in next week so I'll get a leg and give it a try I reckon - after I've de-moulded the man fridge first  
Woodsmoke

I reckon the main reason they don't bury them is due to the fact they have sufficient space & facilities to store them at a guaranteed temperature & humidity? Also, it'll cut down their salt usage dramatically, I should imagine................?
Jonty

Woodsmoke wrote:
I reckon the main reason they don't bury them is due to the fact they have sufficient space & facilities to store them at a guaranteed temperature & humidity? Also, it'll cut down their salt usage dramatically, I should imagine................?


I dunno mate...  I don't really understand it enough but I'm not quite sure what impact temp and humidity would have at the salting stage.  I understand at the curing/aging end but not the initial salting.

I would have assumed that less salt in means equilibrium must still be acheived with less salt absorbed, but then I'm lost.

Tell you what, I'll be having a go soon, if I've got a fridge full of rancid meat then I'll be bulk buying the salt for the next one.
Woodsmoke

Not sure either mate, but I reckon they'll have been doing it for long enough to know exactly how much salt they need to achieve the balance at any given temperature & humidity?

I don't refrigerate mine as they cure, & the humidity varies hugely depending on the weather. I'm pretty certain I don't need 9kg of salt to achieve a cure, but I reckon if I didn't bury the hams would sweat & that would pretty quickly cause the salt to dissolve, as well as let the nasties in?

Black Art, innit?  
Jonty

Woodsmoke wrote:

Black Art, innit?  


'dunno
Jonty

Now,

how would this work...........

Following on from Mr Border's great international Jam pass the parcel, how about a great ham taste and compare? Obviously it'll need to be some months in the future but whilst the hams age, I reckon we could come up with some semblance of a plan.......

Anyone in?

Butterbean, have you got a passport???
Woodsmoke

I'd be in for that  

In the meantime, maybe we could whet our appetites with a bacon swap?
Butterbean

Jonty wrote:
Anyone in?

Butterbean, have you got a passport???


Have a passport but its that "no fly list" which is the kicker.

Sounds fun though.

Speaking of passports I gotta check mine.  I've promised the family a trip next year.
debbie

sounds like it had better be a tour of OTGers BB
LadySlip

we'll be on for that......   miggies wiil be ready in a few weeks and we have a list of stuff to do     Slipster is looking at building a cold room in one of the outbuildings and bro was here last night...... ........and is able to help with panels for said coldroom     hopefully
Butterbean

Woodsmoke wrote:
I reckon the main reason they don't bury them is due to the fact they have sufficient space & facilities to store them at a guaranteed temperature & humidity? Also, it'll cut down their salt usage dramatically, I should imagine................?


I know a guy who buries his but I really don't see the neccessity since only the surface salt is going to enter the meat.
Butterbean

debbie wrote:
sounds like it had better be a tour of OTGers BB


I thought I was an OTGer.  
Jonty

Butterbean wrote:
debbie wrote:
sounds like it had better be a tour of OTGers BB


I thought I was an OTGer.  


C'mon Debs, dig yourself out of this one.......  
debbie

I meant the BRITTISH contingent of OTGers.  Standing invertation for you and yours down here on Exmoor
Jonty

Debbie,

do you use your goats for meat or just dairy?

I've seen a recipe for air died goat prosicutto, I was plannin to buy a leg next time i'm passing the local(ish) supplier and having a go, but that won't be for a while so I might try lamb in the interim.  I think that the method you use for ham would suit it very well.
debbie

ooooooh noooo.  Amber and Bee are for milk but we are quite happy to eat their babies!

I have done a lamb ham (wet cured) and it really wasn't that good although the venison wet cured ham that was then cold smoked then hot smoked was stunning (same as the lamb was).  Air dried goat ham is DEFINITELY on the menu.  We only have 3 or 4 kids a year for goat meat so we are a bit limited really.  Although local restaurants and butchers are clammering for it (definitey a case of write your own ticket) as they have to import it from the midlands we tend to keep them for ourselves or interent sales/friends/family.
Butterbean

debbie wrote:
I meant the BRITTISH contingent of OTGers.  Standing invertation for you and yours down here on Exmoor


Just funning with you.  I couldn't help myself.
LadySlip

debbie wrote:
ooooooh noooo.  Amber and Bee are for milk but we are quite happy to eat their babies!   .




Jonty.... ......you couldn'y possibly eat Amber and Bea

Slipster now thinks we should add goats to the menagerie following our visit to Debbie and Simons.......
debbie

Amber and Bee get to everyone when they meet them - especially Bee!
Jonty

LadySlip wrote:



Jonty.... ......you couldn'y possibly eat Amber and Bea



Betcha I could  
Woodsmoke

I'll get the fire on, mate    
debbie

Woodsmoke wrote:
I'll get the fire on, mate    


Nope, very short sighted of you.   Eat Amber and Bee and no goat futures.  keep Amber and Bee and get around 5 kids a year to eat and loads of goat milk too - enough for drinking, dairying and raising orphan lambs free of charge (have you seen the price of lamlac?) ..........although I have to say Simon wouldn't be adverse to eating Bee - he says something as thick and stupid as her shouldn't be reproduced.

However, back to air dried ham....second half of the cure applied today to the leg that Slipster, Ladyslip and I started when they were down and its looking good.  Ladyslip - check out your chorizo as I looked at mine today and with all this warm weather I think its only a week or so away from being ready.

Would love to join in with the bacon swap but might need to wait for the cooler weather?
LadySlip

debbie wrote:

 Ladyslip - check out your chorizo as I looked at mine today and with all this warm weather I think its only a week or so away from being ready




....keep checking it Deb.....he's never took his beady little eyes off it lol    and ur right  it is nearly ready.........we've had it hanging in a stocking outside on dry cooler days
Jonty

I put an 8 kilo leg into the man fridge last night.  I've read a couple of techniques from parma production methods where a very small amount of salt is used.  One describes a handful per leg being briefly brushed across the raw flesh.  Seems like a frightfully small amount to me. Anyway, a chap called Len Poli has a really good site with stacks of seriously good recipes on it, amongst which is a parma recipe using only salt at a ratio of 4% salt to meat.  Everything else of his I've tried has worked so I thought I'd take a leap of faith.

Im also a big advocate of using curing salts, this recipe has none, just flaky sea salt so that's also something that feels slightly odd to me.

It's not my own pork, but I know who bred it personally so that's ood enough for me for now.

Here's the leg and the 1st salting - a mere 200g



Leg with salt worked in



In to the man fridge for 3 weeks before second salting



I think I'll get another one on the go usig a cure2 based rub son so I can see how they both fayre against each other.
Woodsmoke

Sea salt has naturally-occurring nitrites mate, so you shouldn't need to worry about leaving out the curing salts. I know you're a fan of Len Poli, but I'm really not convinced that such a small amount of salt is going to work, especially with the bone still in the leg. Pork hams tends to rot from the inside, & it's generally the bone that's the beginning of it

Be interesting to see though, & I'll be happy to be proven wrong  
debbie

roughly the same amount of salt as I used Jonty - I tunnel boned the leg to the knee joint though and even though I used sea salt I did use Potassium Nitrate too.
Jonty

It was time for the 2nd application f salt for my ham today.  Luckily no nasty smells when I opened the man fridge..

Here it is straight out of the fridge



quick shot after a rinse and then the woefully small looking amount of salt for the 2nd application



Finished article just before going back into the fridge for 2 - 3 weeks for final cure before drying



Fingers crossed....

As soon as its out ofthe fridge I'll do another one with some cureing salts to contrast & compare
Woodsmoke

It's showing some nice mould on the first pic mate. Apparently, that's exactly the type you want to see....................

That bone is still a worry for me though. I'm just really not convinced that so little salt is going to do the job properly It's going to be really interesting to see how this turns out!
Jonty

Woodsmoke wrote:
It's showing some nice mould on the first pic mate. Apparently, that's exactly the type you want to see....................

That bone is still a worry for me though. I'm just really not convinced that so little salt is going to do the job properly It's going to be really interesting to see how this turns out!


That's not mould mate, just crystalised salt.

I know there's lots of concern about the bone, but if thousands of parma hams are produced every day, all on the bone following a similar recipe so I'm happy to give it a go and see what happens
debbie

my "ham" has come out of its small amount of salt today - three days late actually -ran out of time.  been rinsed and soaked for the 40 mins as required.  weather has turned so very warm I have returned to fridge as is (time again really) but after the weekend will be covering cut ends with lard, rapping in muslin and hanging.  having spent a month in my fridge - no nasty smells but a firm texture to the meat and it certainly lost a fair amount of liquid in the curing process.
debbie

well my ham isstill in the fridge just resting on the bars and still looking good and "hammy" weather is changing so hope to get it out and hang it very soon but so far so good
Jonty

Thanks for the reminder Debbie, I'll have a look at mine later on.  Like you I'm waiting for the temp to drop a bit before I hang it.  I'm also going to get another one into cure using pretty much the same technique you've used to do a compare & contrast.  From what I've read, the drying process is much faster, do you find that yourself?
debbie

I don't know Jonty - I have only ever used this method.  I did try some ham from one buried in salt that had been done by someone who buys a pig from me every year - when he came for a visit he brought some with him to try.  He said that  it was fine near the bone but the outside was far too salty and was mostly used for cooking - I have promised him some of this one to try when its ready in the meantime when he gets his next pig from us at the end of the month he is going to try this method so will be interesting to hear how he compares the two.  Its certaimly a lot cheaper on salt thats for sure!!!!
Woodsmoke

debbie wrote:
I did try some ham from one buried in salt.............it was fine near the bone but the outside was far too salty and was mostly used for cooking


Must've been in the salt far too long, at a guess. Mine get buried, but I can't say they're overly salty at all
debbie

Looking back on the thread Jonty - did you not start a ham usin limited salt instead of burying it?
Jonty

Yes debbie, two saltings, the 1st was 200g and the 2nd was 100g.  Just salt no cure.

The reason I asked about the drying times is that from what I've read, soley salt based curing methods suggest a few months drying with the flesh exposed whereas the method you're using with the addition of some cure 2 has an application of lard over the flesh immediately.  To me this implies that there must be a greater liquid loss during the curing period as the lard is to retard the drying process
Mo

Ho Hum...

Just taken our leg out of it's deep salt bed.
It looks dark (?)
Smells ok.

From the Large Blacks we are going to try Debbie's Way.
We are also going to do some short leg cuts in wet cure.
I think... that was The Plan last time we spoke about it... it could all change tomorrow  
debbie

Jonty wrote:
Yes debbie, two saltings, the 1st was 200g and the 2nd was 100g.  Just salt no cure.

The reason I asked about the drying times is that from what I've read, soley salt based curing methods suggest a few months drying with the flesh exposed whereas the method you're using with the addition of some cure 2 has an application of lard over the flesh immediately.  To me this implies that there must be a greater liquid loss during the curing period as the lard is to retard the drying process


I would imagine less liquid loss with the limited amount of salt than with burying it.  I used a very limited amount of potassium nitrate in the cure, a little cracked pepper, a few juniper berries and two torn bayleaves (I think)  I think the lard is to protect the cut surfaces and yes maybe slow down the drying process to aloow to mature longer?  A guess though I don't know for sure - I do know the end resut is stunning though.

Mo, good luck with your curing.  Can't wait to hear how you get on.  I too have a bucket full of gammons awaiting the attention of my smoker next week - may end up freezing them though and smoking them nearer to christmas.
LadySlip

Mo wrote:
Ho Hum...

It looks dark (?)
Smells ok



so far so good then Mo..................you will soooo definitely know when it ain't right...........our first attempt failed at about 3 months in      and smell nearly took your head off



We have yet to try again.......
Mo

debbie wrote:

Mo, good luck with your curing.  Can't wait to hear how you get on.  I too have a bucket full of gammons awaiting the attention of my smoker next week - may end up freezing them though and smoking them nearer to christmas.


Thanks Debbie. We won't be smoking ours   Unless we "Bodge" something together and have a go at smoking a wee one.
Mo

LadySlip wrote:
Mo wrote:
Ho Hum...

It looks dark (?)
Smells ok



so far so good then Mo..................you will soooo definitely know when it ain't right...........our first attempt failed at about 3 months in      and smell nearly took your head off



We have yet to try again.......


Heehee! Thanks for that  
Jonty

[quote="debbie:245188"]
Jonty wrote:
Yes I think the lard is to protect the cut surfaces and yes maybe slow down the drying process to aloow to mature longer?  A guess though I don't know for sure - I do know the end resut is stunning though.


It's definately to slow down the drying process debbie, you can mux pepper in with it to deter the flies too
Mo

Aye, there's nowt like  a good 'muxing'  
Jonty

Mo wrote:
Aye, there's nowt like  a good 'muxing'  


Doesn't everyone multiplex their pepper  

Mo, petal, you can see by the time of my post, (7:41) the little darlings had been in bed for approximately 41 minutes, we're normally three G&T's down and onto the red by then, my typing does, erm, suffer somewhat
Mo

Don't get me wrong, I think it's a great word and should be used more often.
Having said that, I've only tried it out on the dog & chicks so far.... not impressed  
debbie

ham out of the fridge and looking very nice so far.  cut sufaces have been smeared with a lard and pepper mix and wrapped in muslin.  Is hanging from the coat hooks in the hall way on a butchers hook through the tenden cut - which just to be safe I have also packed with lard.
Jonty

My ham is 7 weeks on, 4 weeks in the fridge with salt and 3 hanging wrapped in muslin.  I've just checked it and I'm really pleased - it smells hammy rather than rancid.  Its hangiong in a louvre door cupboard less that 1m away from my office chair where I spend the best part of 8 hours a day so I should get the heads up if it starts going off!
debbie

mine too - I am dead pleased with it so far...to re-cap, mine spent a total of 28 days wrapped in clingfilm and cure in the fridge (applied in two different halves) then wash and spent another three or four weeks in the fridge unwrapped as it was really too warm to hang and has been smeared, wrapped and hung since the 13th October.
Jonty

Just ordered another leg so I can do a like for like comparison with the quite authentic parma technique I've applied to the 1st leg.  This one will be done similar to the method Debbie has used, tunnel boned and then cured with salt and Cure#2. It'll be interesting to compare the two when (if!!) they're done.
Jonty

Meet Alan!  (did anyone see that fantastic program 'Mummifying Alan')

Had a quick look at my ham the otherday, it's dry over most of the surface but had a gooey spot   It is the lowest point og the ham as it hangs so I'm convincing myself that it's wher moisture is leeching out of the meat.  Anyway, gave it a bit of a wipe and left the muslin unwrapped, it seems to be doing the trick and its drier now after a couple of days exposed to the air.



Jonty

I picked up another leg today, my plan is to produce another ham using a different method to increase my chances of having at least one of them not rotting on me!!

This one is going to be done pretty much the same way that Debbie's ham is done, with salt, sugar and cure 2 being the main ingredients of the cure and then the leg is wrapped in clingfilm during the curing period (2 off 2 week applications).

I nicked the method from Franco off the sausagemaking.org site but I've left the juniper/black pepper etc out of the mix as I just want the flavour of the meat for a comparison with the other leg I'm doing.

Here's the leg, with boone out and the cure split into two quantities



Here it is with half the cure applied



Wrapped up



Now in the fridge with a weight on it to flatten it out a bit
Mo



Our first Ham got maggots
kaz

Mo wrote:


Our first Ham got maggots


That's not very encouraging  
Mo



Sorry

I now know it happens quite a bit and we should just have brushed them off, repainted the Ham and let it hang again.
However, at the time we didn't have time to research properly. We found them when we did a quick check before going away. We wouldn't have been here to keep an eye on it anyway, so we had to let it go.

We have two more drying now.
Jonty

Interesting,

the ham that I've just put into cure is leaching much more liquid than the one I only used salt on.  There's been more come out of it in a couple of days than in the 1st fortnight of the salt only leg.
Jonty

Ham No.2 has had 2 weeks in the 1st half of the cure so it was time to get it out and give it the 2nd half.  Once i unwrapped it from the cling film it was looking pretty good, very 'bacony', also, as it was wrapped up with nowhere for the liquid to leach, I don't know if you've ever seen a body pulled from a river but.......

Anyhoo, back to the ham, as the bone was out, I've had a weighted board (aka socket set plus breeze block) on top so it's got the more typical prosicutto look



meat looks good for two weeks old  



another two weeks in the man fridge then time to hang it in the curing chamber, erm, cupboard behind my desk in the office
Mo

Jonty, I've been meaning to ask who's big toe have you got in your Ham?

(The pic in the Alan post)
debbie

  it does look like someones big toe too!  I hadn't noticed before - maybe the toe of someone that has bad feet hygene or has been dead for a while!
Jonty

Mo wrote:
Jonty, I've been meaning to ask who's big toe have you got in your Ham?

(The pic in the Alan post)


Fantastic Mo, fantastic  

You didn't put a toe in yours??  Everone knows they get maggoty if you don't put a toe in it!
Mo

Jonty wrote:
Mo wrote:
Jonty, I've been meaning to ask who's big toe have you got in your Ham?

(The pic in the Alan post)


Fantastic Mo, fantastic  

You didn't put a toe in yours??  Everone knows they get maggoty if you don't put a toe in it!




See? You learn stuff in here that no-one else will tell you....
Woodsmoke

Yep!

My smoked ham didn't have a big toe in it ('cos I only had one left after the last ham), & the result was it went maggoty!

You have been warned  
debbie

debbie wrote:
Just checked on my air dried ham.

Have taken the muslin off and scraped off the lard and black pepper from the cut surface and to say I am chuffed is probably understantement of the year.  The surface of the ham is a lovelly dark pink, its quite firm to press but not quite firm enough. I sliced a wafer thin piece to see how we are getting on.  Its beautiful.  Not salty at all and a back not of the sarrano ham flavour it will have in a few more months time.  I have smeared on some of the lard again but not as thick as before and am now confident that by spring I will have a totally stunning ham.  I was a little concerned because of how warm this winter has been comparitively speaking but I can say that come next autumn a dutch airer will be up in the vestibule and there will be a good few hams hanging up there along with the chorizo.  Now, all I need is a recipe for Lomo - can anyone help?
Jonty

debbie wrote:
Now, all I need is a recipe for Lomo - can anyone help?


Glad your ham is looking good Debbie.

RE Lomo, I'm not 100% what the differences are between lomo and lonzino are I think they are just spanish & italian variations on the same process and cut, possibly lomo doesn't get stuffed into a skin either...

anyway, here's a link to one I made earlier, if I recall correctly, it was a tad too hard.  If you try it, I'd suggest weighing it and then hanging until it lost 30% of it's weight, the 45% mine lost was a bit too much

http://overthegate.myfreeforum.or...t23000.html&highlight=lonzino
debbie

Thanks Jonty.

Have done a bit more research and it seems that the Lomo is made from the eye of meat completely trimmed of fat from the loin and that you use a cure similar to that for sarrano ham but with the addition of paprika (that gives the pink tinge to the outside) either dulce or smoked its then hung and dried same as the sarrano ham would be but as you say with about 30% loss of moisture.  No need to stuff into a skin.

Managed to get the above from my sister who lived in spain for 15 years until two years ago and still keeps in touch with her spannish friends.  Will be giving it a go when we kill our next berkshire.
Jonty

Good to know Debbie, Thanks.

Just be aware that you'd be surprised how quickly the meat will dry out as an exposed muscle rather than a large skin encased leg - youll be looking at a matter of weeks or less rather than months.
debbie

Its worked so well coating the cut surfaces of the leg in lard - the meat is still tender and soft (nothing like the plasticy stuff you get in packets) and could easily hang for another year without being too hard I think - it just seems to be deapenng in flavour - that I thought I might employ the same method with the lomo - I know our chorizo definitely dries too fast so I can feel some experimenting coming on I think
Jonty

I meant the Lomo debbie, joints such as fillets dry really quicly so it's best to keep weighing them to check weight loss as they can over dry really quickly.
debbie

Jonty wrote:
I meant the Lomo debbie, joints such as fillets dry really quicly so it's best to keep weighing them to check weight loss as they can over dry really quickly.


same problem with my chorizo.  I think because I am drying without humidity control I need to keep testing smearing with lard adding more lard depending on weather etc - not just a case of leaving it to get on with it maybe?  Facinating process

When I finally slice this ham I will send you some vac pack slices if you fancy trying it although my sister says I should be leaving it for 18 months - she's a bit of a purest (or at least her friends are) about this - no chance though going on last nights tasting
Jonty

That'd be great Debbie, I'll return the favour with some of mine.  I am definately going to leave the salt only leg for a year, but the salt/cure 2 leg may well only see 6 months out

I'm about to lard both of mine up tonight using a mix of lard, semolina and black pepper.
debbie

didn't use semolina on mine - not seen that but half a pound of lard with about two desert spoons of ground black pepper coated on all cut surfaces, sealing the cavity after pressing from the tunnel boning and packed into the tendon cut kept the flies at bay even in the warm weather - and we are in sheep country so boy do we get some flies!

Would love to try some of yours when its ready.

Now I just have to hope that I can afford some of my own berkshire pork to make that lomo!
Jonty

debbie wrote:

Now I just have to hope that I can afford some of my own berkshire pork to make that lomo!


Mates rates surely!!!
Jonty

Here's my two, the one on the left has been hanging a month and was cured with a mixture of salt, sugar and cure 2.  The one on the right (with the toe   ) has been hanging three months and was cured only with a very small amount of salt.



Here they are smeared with a paste of lard, pepper and semolina.  This'll slow down the drying process and allow the hams to mature.

debbie

Mine was cured with 125g of sea salt, 25g brown sugar to every kg of meat to the total amount of cure I added 2g of Potassium nitrate a few cruched juniper and black pepper corns - there may have been a couple of torn bay leaves in there too.  Like you I applied half the total amount of cure inside and out wrapped tightly in cling film and left for two weeks I then unwrapped, applied second half of cure re-wrapped, weighted and left for another two weeks.  Then the normal wash, soak 20 minutes, wipe with white wine vinegar and applied a mix of lard and ground pepper - its been hanging since begining of October I think.  I'll try and get some photographs and see if I can email them to someone to post for me.
Jonty

Having agreed to take on the role of secretarial assistant to Debbie    she's sent me some pics of her ham to post up.

Here it is larded up to retard drying and aid mauturation



Here we go with the flesh exposed....Looking good Deb



And here's one of the skin side



Debbie advised me that she likes to torture all her animals before slaughter, hence the acute angle of the foot

in all seriouslness, that looks like a beauty Deb - I'm looking forward to trying some of it  
debbie

Thanks for that Jonty, you'r a star.  I just have to resist now at least until end of march to give it the six months but I cannot see its going to last beyond that.  As soon as I start to slice it I'll vac pac some and put in the post to you.

My projects come September will include some Lomo
LadySlip

is looking really good Debbie
debbie

Hate to say it Ladyslip but even at 3 and a bit months old it tastes fantastic Not as good as it will be of course but still...
Jonty

debbie wrote:

My projects come September will include some Lomo


Debbie, would that be doing it in september as you're waiting for the weather to cool down because I reckon it'll be cured in a couple of weeks and dried in a couplke more... you could get one on now
debbie

Yes Jonty I was thinking of the weather really but you are right - if I start one soon it will be finished before the flies come out.  Killing a berkshire at the begining of Feb so maybe I could start one then even if its just with half a loin. - should be ready maybe to send you a sample at the same time as the ham.
Mo

Jonty - forgot to say that we did the Lonzino and loved it, although one got a bit too hard. It was still good to chew on though.

Thanks for sharing it with us  

Debbie - your Ham looks amazing!
Jonty

I was just wondering how everyone's hams are doing.  I was going to take mine out this week and take a look under the lard.  By all accounts the one i made with cure 2 should be ready for eating now.  I'm going to leave the salt only ham for another year or so before I try that one.

Updates please  
debbie

sorry but mine hasn't been hung as long as yours.  been eating it for the last month and it is totally delicious.  As soon as I can afford a couple of pig legs I will be curing another two and endeavour to hang at least one for more than a year but patients isn't exactly my strong point! in the mean time have some fat belly and some bath chaps to have a go with.
Mo

One of our hams has been hanging for 10 months - we just broke into it


Jonty

Looks marvelous Mo   does it live up to your expectations

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