Archive for Over the Gate Join in for a friendly chat over the gate about home and country matters. (Nominated Charity The British Heart Foundation)
 


       Over the Gate Forum Index -> Recipes
escape

A Bread Recipe

Hi All,

Been impressed with this one I thought I would share it with you all..

500g Strong white bread flour
2 tsp salt
15g fresh yeast
30g vegetable shortening
1tsp sugar
300ml warm water (100ml freshly boiled 200ml cold water)

First put the yeast and the water in a bowl and leave for 5 mins (I also add the shortening as it makes it a lot softer and easier to knead)

In a mixing bowl add the flour and salt and mix (so the salt does not kill the yeast)

Pour the yeast mixture into the bowl of flour and salt and stir until well combined and forms a dough.

Knead the dough for 10 mins (it will be sticky but keep at it, it becomes smother and less sticky over time).

Place in a lightly oiled bowl, cover with cling film or a damp tea towel and leave to prove in a warm draft less place for 2 hours (or until dough has doubled in size)

Preheat oven to 240c (gas 9). Flatten the risen dough with your hand then knead for 30 seconds. Roll out into a sausage shape and place onto a greased baking sheet, and leave to prove for 30 mins.

Slash the top of the bread and bake in the oven for 10 mins at 240c (gas 9) then turn down to 200c (gas 6). Bake bread for a further 10 – 15 mins. If you tap the base of the bread and it sounds hollow the bread is baked.

Lave to cool on a wire rack.
largewhite

By shortening do you mean lard?
Regards, Lw
escape

I use TREX which is a vegetable fat, it looks similar to lard
Mark W

Having baked virtually all my own bread for about the past 5+ years, that recipe sounds like a good 'un.  I tend to use "fast action" yeast as you only need to rise the bread once - no knocking back or proving - but I'll use proper yeast if I have time (and if I can get more than a sliver of yeast).

A note on fats.  I usually use block (NOT spready) margarine in the bread.  However, I bake my bread in a tin, and to grease the tin I only use butter.  The marg makes the crumb of the loaf slightly lighter than marg and the butter adds a little extra colour & taste to the crust.
gerryindevon

Mark W wrote:
 However, I bake my bread in a tin, and to grease the tin I only use butter. .

I always flour the bottom of the tin, no fat at all. The done bread just falls out of the tin, no sticking.
milkermel

must admit i cheat and have a non stick pan interested that you put fat in with the mix, i use HFW recipe that he did on telly and works a gem, I ocasionally buy the fancy seed mixes from supermarket but mix them in with the white bread flour to make them go further.

had to cut back on my bread making though as OH seems to have an intolerance to yeast or flour (not sure which) since giving up the beer last year any thing yeasty or too much flour and he bloats up - used to blame it on the £2 a pint night  but now we know better!
Mark W

I use a non-stick bread tin, but the butter a) makes doubly sure that it doesn't stick and b) gives a better colour to the crust.

I've got to recommend using some kind of fat (butter, lard, dripping, oil or, like me, margarine) in the mix.  It shouldn't be much (say 1oz marg to 24oz of flour - a bit less if you use oil) but it will assist the loaf in resisting staling.

Starch chains are long and staling is when they come back to being parallel (as they were in the grain).  Fat helps stop them from doing this.  There is also a slightly altered "fat" called glycerol monostearate, E471, that is sometimes used.

I've had a lot of commercial experience of starch staling (though not in bread, but it works the same) and posted some of it on the Real Bread Campaign website http://www.sustainweb.org/realbread/.  It's also in this month's edition of their magazine, True Loaf.

(Yes, I have done some [~20 years] time in making food!)

If you like proper bread, check out their site.
milkermel

sounds interesting - bit of butter it will be then in the next mix - excuse my ignorance - but what is staling? Off to try out the butter technique now!
Rick Harris

Sourcing live Yeast

For those of you who make their own bread but find live yeast difficult to locate - If you have a Morrisons locally they sell live yeast but they hid it!

It is generally close to the butter/cheese section on a chilled shelf.

You can try asking but I don't have a lot of faith in that.

For my Birthday last year my other half sent me on a bread making course at a local cookery school. Very interesting and we haven't bought bread since.

You can avoid a lot of time and effort by using the overnight in the fridge method.

Mix bread as usual just as far as getting the dough to stay together - no kneading required.

Put in a bowl or oiled plastic bag over night in the fridge.

In the morning remove take out and shape leave for 40 mins/ an hour to warm up and final rise and cook.

It works.
gerryindevon

Re: Sourcing live Yeast

Rick Harris wrote:
You can avoid a lot of time and effort by using the overnight in the fridge method..

I don't use a bread-maker and find dough keeps fine just in a normal room.
Elizabeth David used to say dough kept in fridge went hard or something; I've never tried it.
Rick Harris

Re: Sourcing live Yeast

gerryindevon wrote:

I don't use a bread-maker and find dough keeps fine just in a normal room.
Elizabeth David used to say dough kept in fridge went hard or something; I've never tried it.


I don't use tins as I find that I like the rustic shape of a round loaf & I use olive oil, supplies the fat to make the bread keep and I like the taste, it also stops the dough sticking to your hands if your kneading.

As long as you cover the dough or put in a plastic bag it won't go hard.
Mark W

Re: Sourcing live Yeast

Rick Harris wrote:
For those of you who make their own bread but find live yeast difficult to locate - If you have a Morrisons locally they sell live yeast but they hid it!


In respect of an earlier post, I no longer use fast-action yeast (unless REALLY rushed).  I now use proper soft yeast.

If your local ASDA has a bakery, they'll probably let you have a couple of ounces free.  As I make bread at least three times per week, this doesn't really suit so I asked if I could buy some.

I now get a so**ing great block (1½-2lb) for £1.60.

Don't bother with T***o unless your local is very different from our (large) branch.  They only do bake-off in their "bakery".

       Over the Gate Forum Index -> Recipes
Page 1 of 1
Create your own free forum | Buy a domain to use with your forum